Apr
27
2016

Pompeii new secrets revealed

A new special of the BBC One show 60 minute has helped uncover some myteries in Pompeii. This is one of the most iconic archaeological sites and with the use of the FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D unearthed the human stories behind the casts hidden underground.  The presenter of the show Mary Beard is a passionate TV historian who wanted to find out the truth the bodies underneath the ashes. This ancient city was destroyed by volcanic ash and pumice during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. Researchers were able to examine in detail the remains of bodies to find out more about how these people lived their lives thousands of years ago.

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The precise yet simple laser scanner is especially suited to the outdoors due to its small size and lightweight capabilities. The FARO Focus3D Laser scanner was able to perform the most detailed scan of the archaeological site and was shown on the BBC One show for the world to see. The Focus3D can create a precise, virtual copy of the scanned objects at millimetre accuracies in only minutes by capturing up to 976,000 data points per second. Estelle Lazer from the University of Sydney was able along with her team to help Mary unpick the remains which are preserved in Pompeii.

Pompeii New Secrets Revealed from ScanLAB on Vimeo.

Apr
18
2016

The FARO laser scanner records everything that happens on the building site…

Previously a bank, now a large restaurant of 720 metres, with a capacity of 140 seats: the construction of Studio 16, which opened its doors in Orléans in the
Autumn of 2015, represented a huge challenge in terms of construction, development of the space and decoration.

MB Design, a firm specializing in interior architecture, was charged with the creation and the realisation of this new concept, and monitored the progress of the building work closely, over a period of 8 months. “We had decided to carry out surveys using a FARO Focus3D X 130 scanner as the work progressed. In doing so, we were able to ensure a real and precise indication of the position of all elements of the site that would end up being hidden by various partitions and covers. The objective was to know exactly where the pipes and cables lay, which would turn out to be very useful later, for example when making an alteration, or if a problem were to occur in one of the hidden installations (a blocked pipe or a leak, for example),” said Michael Bustillo, Director of MB Design and sister company ABM2 (which specialises in surveys).

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Like any establishment open to the public, the restaurant had to comply with building regulations before being allowed to open. A problem comes to light at this point: the facilities are 4 cm above the permitted height. Who is to blame? The plumber says he worked with the reference line, i.e. the horizontal level line marked on the wall by the bricklayer. The surveys obtained by ABM2 quickly prove otherwise: the resolution of the FARO Focus3D scanner is such that the bricklayer’s line is clearly visible. This simple fact has farreaching consequences: “Firstly, we have not lost time discussing whether the bricklayer or the plumber was right. Then we saved money because to trace a possible line level would have required breaking tiles which had been laid on top of it. Finally, there is no dispute to be resolved: the plumber being wrong, the removal of the fittings and their reinstallation at the right height becomes his problem,” explains Michael Bustillo. In playing the role of “justice of the peace”, the scanner saved a great deal of time and the establishment was able to open on schedule.

Read more

Apr
08
2016

4 Reasons to attend the MACH Fair

It’s that time of the year again! FARO will be attending the UK’s premier manufacturing technologies exhibition, MACH 2016. This event runs every 2 years.

With a 7 days left until the exhibition check out the 4 reasons to be at the FARO stand booth 5910.

 

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 FARO Robo Imager- The first mobile, ready to work 3D measurement solution will be on show at the MACH Fair. A mobile and flexible robot with a setup time of less than 5 minutes, it is seen as a product with great benefits for the automotive, aerospace and mechanical engineering industry.

FARO experts on hand to help – The wonderful expert team will be on hand to help you out with any queries you may have. You will be provided with the opportunity to see live demonstrations from a wide range of products from Metrology & 3D Documentation.

 

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Great Quality stands – There will be a wide range of innovative products from many different exhibitors. FARO will be exhibiting a wide range of products from Metrology and 3D Documentation. This will include the newly highly-adaptable FARO Cobalt Array 3D Imager, a metrology grade non-contact scanner which utilizes blue light technology to capture millions of high resolution 3D coordinate measurements in seconds. We will also be presenting the high speed FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D X Series for detailed 3D modelling and image documentation as well as the recently released 3D Laser Scanner Freestyle3D X with enhanced accuracy of 1 millimetre at a 1-metre range.

Raffle Prize – Test your knowledge of the FARO Cobalt Array 3D Imager and your in with a chance to win a prize. Test your knowledge of our new scanner metrological level FARO 3D Imager Array Cobalt for the production workshop and assembly . Come to stand booth 5910 and take our quiz and return your completed ballot in the ballot box at the FARO booth. You can also download the quiz here.

 

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You will be able to find the answers on our FARO Cobalt information page.

Don’t forget stand booth 5910

 

 

Dec
18
2015

New methods in the Big Bat Cave

Engineers trial new surveying methods in Kentucky. Parts of the “Big Bat Cave” are precisely recorded with 3D laser scanners. An extremely demanding project: There is hardly any light underground and it is very confined in places.

The Big Bat Cave is a great attraction for cave explorers and nature-lovers. The history of the area comes to life here; rare crayfish, crickets and bats are at home there. For the “Kentucky Karst Conservancy” , conservation of the landscape and nature is a matter of top priority, and in the engineers of QK4, Louisville, they found highly capable supporters.

The experts are testing new methods of acquiring data when surveying – and one of them is recording using 3D laser scanners. The engineers swapped their traditional surveying tools for a FARO Focus3D X 130 laser scanner whilst systematically and digitally recording the “Big Bat Cave” system in three dimensions. An exciting and groundbreaking experiment, which engineer Ben Shinabery explains step by step.

 

The three dimensional measurement is carried out from various standpoints using precisely defined reference points. The laser scanner takes around 8 minutes for each setting, measuring almost 1 million points per second in a 360-degree radius. This provides the surveyors with point clouds, which are then processed on the computer. FARO SCENE software is ideal in this context for creating three-dimensional models. The surveying team worked through the cave metre by metre, including through some tight spots which were difficult to access.

In this cramped, dark environment the advantages of the FARO Focus3D X 130 laser scanner come into their own: small and light, quick to set up and dismantle, and easily transported in the cave. Non-contact scanning delivers true-to-scale and ultra-precise data. The initial results were impressive. Project manager Ben Shinabery: “Now almost anyone can use the 3D models for scientific analysis: students, scientists and consultants.”

Kentucky is a region well-known for its caves – including the Mammoth Cave National Park, the longest known cave system in the world.  However, its little sister in Breckinridge Kentucky also has its charms, as shown by this project. Now it is to contribute to preserving and protecting it. A first impression of the 13.9-mile cave system recorded to date is provided by the fly-through, which carries you off into the widely ramified system of underground corridors.

 

Nov
26
2015

Always one step ahead – 10 years of laser scanning

An unprecedented success story began ten years ago when iQvolution AG of Ludwigsburg, Germany, was acquired by FARO Technologies, Inc. This global market leader in the area of portable coordinate measuring machines added 3D laser scanners to its array of products as a result.

“We are confident that this step will push the continuing development of our 3D laser scanning technology towards new products and strengthen the global expansion of our market presence”, said Dr. Bernd Becker, founder of iQvolution and now Chief Technology Strategist at FARO Europe, commenting on the merger – and he was proven right.

A whole range of innovative developments in the areas of 3D laser technology and computer-aided measuring systems bear witness to success. FARO has been ahead of the market for years. How about some examples? In 2006, FARO introduced a laser scanner that allowed three-dimensional measurements to be taken outdoors – and this was a sensation. A short time afterwards, the company again surprised the market when they presented the Photon laser scanner.

The big breakthrough came in 2010 – only five years after taking over the 3D laser scanner line of business and incorporating it into the FARO portfolio: FARO developed the smallest and lightest laser scanner in the world. Furthermore, this high-tech device was as easy to use as a digital camera. The company showcased its consistent ongoing developments with the Focus3D X 130 and the Focus3D X 330, which allow an even greater range while providing excellent and precise measurement results. The 3D documentation business also sustained further growth that year with the Freestyle3D models – top-quality high-precision hand scanners.

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[Read more …]

Oct
14
2015

Increased safety for pieces of art

Now it’s official: paintings and pieces of art that have been scanned with the FARO Focus3D suffer no damage through heat. This has been confirmed by a report by Seibersdorf Labor GmbH.

The recordings of pieces of art or interiors of museums is quick and reliable with laser scanners – and can even be done during visiting hours thanks to the safety of scanners for eyes. Nevertheless, the question of whether pieces of art suffer damage as a result of scanning arises time and again. Reason enough for FARO to have this danger investigated in a report.

Oil paintings are seen as particularly sensitive. Paint and oil have low thermal conductivity and heat capacity values. The high-energy laser could cause an increase in the temperature on the surface and damage the substance of the painting considerably. The report does away with these fears.

Meet the new FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D X 330
For a worst case scenario, a FARO Focus3D X was set up at a distance of one metre from an oil painting – without any protective glass between the piece and the scanner. If a scan is conducted in which the scanner moves horizontally – as is customary in practice – there is a temperature increase on the surface of the oil painting of less than 1.3 degrees Celsius. Even if the head of the scanner doesn’t move and the painting is thus scanned with the laser beams for several minutes, the maximum temperature increase is under 2 degrees Celsius.

To test restorative techniques for example, it is normal to place items with oil paints in an oven for several days at over 60 degrees Celsius and so accelerate an aging process. Against this backdrop, it quickly becomes clear that a short-term temperature increase of less than 2 degrees Celsius due to the FARO Focus3D will cause no damage. This has now been confirmed in the report by Seibersdorf Labor GmbH. It also permits the conclusion that photochemical effects are very unlikely at a wavelength of 1,550 nm – good news for the use of the FARO family of laser scanners in the area of cultural assets.

Aug
12
2015

FARO @ TCT Birmingham

FARO staff will demonstrate the FARO Edge touchscreen computer for basic measurements, the FARO Laser ScanArm HD with the lightest laser line probe for non-contact measurements and the revolutionary high speed FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D for detailed 3D modeling and image documentation. To help illustrate the FARO Edge ScanArm HD LLP remarkable data-capture and transfer capabilities it will be connected to a Laser Lines 3D printer.

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TCT Live is the event for Product Development and Additive Manufacturing in Europe. It is an essential event for everyone involved in the concept, design, specification and manufacturing process to learn about the latest in Additive Manufacturing, 3D Printing and other cutting edge product development software and technology.

Jul
23
2015

FARO, Autodesk & UCL AEC tech collaboration day

With around 100 participants involved in the FARO, Autodesk & UCL AEC tech collaboration day, the event itself seems to have gone down very well indeed. We would like to thank all those who took part and helped make this event happen with a special shout out to Autodesk and the guys over at UCL for all their support.

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Due to the success of the event we plan to hold an annual event so stay tuned for more details..

However if you wish to find out more about what we do here at FARO then check out our FARO UK Website or alternitavely check out our FARO UK YouTube channel!

Jul
20
2015

Scientists Build High Precision 3D Model of Gomantong Caves

Located in Sabah, East Malaysia, Gomantong Caves is a 65-million-year-old limestone cave system that is famous for its edible-nest swiftlet and bat populations, as well as an ecosystem of critters and creatures that thrive in dark and moist conditions. Despite its harsh environment, Gomantong still sees its fair share of visitors, whether they be bird’s nests collectors or eco-tourists.

In July 2014, a group of seven international academics embarked on an expedition to the far North East of Borneo to study the renowned Gomantong Caves. Funded by the National Geographic Society, one of the world’s largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions, the project’s goal was to obtain highprecision, three-dimensional (3D) laser scans of the complex cave systems, and to integrate the scan data with the digital elevation model of Gomantong Hill’s surface.

Involving specialists of various fields from six countries, the study is driven by an interest to understand the interaction between animals and landform changes, and is a continuation of earlier expeditions to Gomantong Caves and Niah Caves in Sarawak. FARO – the world’s most trusted source for 3D measurement technology – partnered the team.

Gomantong caves

Obtaining a 3D Model

Under the guidance of Professor Donald MacFrlane from the Keck Science Department, The Claremont Colleges (California, USA), the interdisciplinary research team included Mr. Warren Roberts from the Honhold Library, The Claremont Colleges, Professor Joyce Lundberg from the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa (Canada), Professor Manfred F. Buchroithner and Mr. Benjamin Schröter from the Institute for Cartography, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), Mr. Guy van Rentergem from Deinze (Belgium) and Keith Christensen from Falls Church (Virginia, USA).

Prof. Buchroithner commented, “This expedition is an essential data collection trip for us to build a very detailed 3D model that will enable further scientific research. The 3D ‘cave map’ will then form the basis of various geologic and biologic tasks that each team member will undertake.”

For the cave biologist, it would be important to identify the exact distribution of bats and swiftlets; for the geologist, however, the vertical profiles that indicate cave genesis or the horizontal profiles that give elevation contour lines would be vital information. In that regard, it is absolutely critical for the team to ensure flawless execution in the early stages of data collection.

Gotamon caves

Prior Knowledge & Rich Experience

As several members possessed rich experience in terrestrial laser scanning, particularly in caves, the team had a good idea of what was required, and of what to expect. In particular, given that scanning would be performed in a remote location that was dark, dirty, humid, and distant, the device had to be able to overcome all those difficulties.

Having had prior experience with the FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D, Prof. Buchroithner was fully aware of its capabilities. He shared, “Clearly, we needed a device that was rugged, lightweight, and capable of capturing accurate data even with low ambient lighting. My prior encounter with the Focus3D gave me full confidence that the new Focus3D X 330 would deliver the results we needed. In fact, it surpassed our expectations in several ways!”

Over 17 days of fieldwork, the team worked tirelessly for at least eight hours a day, taking a total of 270 detailed, over-lapping scans in the cave system. Back in the office, these scans were then processed using the FARO SCENE software, which eventually resulted in the detailed 3D cave model that the team desired.

The research team unanimously felt that the Focus3D X 330 provided highly accurate scans in a consistent manner. Measurement times were also significantly reduced as the device could collect large amounts of data in just a few minutes. In addition, the power efficiency and portability of the Focus3D X 330 – both in weight and form factor – made it even more attractive for the cave-scanning project. Not only was the device easy to bring around, it did not require additional computers or heavy battery units for a day out in the field.

On several occasions, the team members had to perform scans in extreme ‘exposed locations’, where there was no way to deploy the device on a tripod. The Focus3D X 330 was put to the test, as it collected data while being held in oblique or even horizontal positions. In some instances, researchers even risked their lives to perform scans by hanging from vertical rock-faces of cave shafts, just to collect sufficient point cloud data for a complete model. These ‘stunts’ were made possible only because the Focus3D X 330could scan even with significant device inclination, unlike other older devices that required a level base.

Perhaps most noteworthy of all, the latest version of the FARO SCENE enabled the team to process the captured data more efficiently. The software’s ability to support targetless scan registration meant that artificial markers were no longer required for scans to be positioned in post-processing. In actual fact, the FARO SCENE stitched data from separate scans accurately and quickly, even under challenging conditions.

“The automated merging function in the FARO SCENE facilitates the processing of scans tremendously,” said Prof. Buchroithner. “The fact that the software can deal with an irregular environment like the Gomantong Caves is a testament of its strength.”

Indeed, the FARO SCENE software was celebrated for its user-friendliness by this research team. It allowed them to generate reports easily and to utilize CAD data in later stages. Photo-realistic images could also be added as an overlay to provide simulation, providing flexibility in data manipulation.

At the end of the trip, the interdisciplinary research team managed to complete the geometric model they aimed for. Furthermore, the resulting 3D ‘cave map’ is now the most accurate worldwide, and the one with the highest data volume. Prof. Buchroithner concluded, “We appreciate the technical support that we have received from FARO in the past few years. Without it, these demanding projects would not have been possible. I hope to ‘conquer’ more caves in other parts of the world with FARO in future.”

 

Jul
14
2015

2015 Innovation Awards – Faro Crime Scene Scanner

A clip from Larimer County demonstrating the benefits of our FARO Laser Scanner and how it excels in comparison to previous methods when tasked with documenting a crime scene.

Brian Wangler, a Crime Lab Analyst for the Northern Colorado Sheriff’s Office, received the award for his efforts in introducing the FARO Focus3D X 120 Laser Scanner solution to Larimer County.

By allowing investigators to capture crime scenes in 3D, the FARO Laser Scanner provides an exact record of the entire scene at the touch of a button and permits the site to be returned to normal use a short time later.

With 3D documentation replacing crime scene sketches, the crime scene reconstruction can be visited multiple times to verify witness testimony or evaluate hypotheses. Forensic scientists can accurately analyze line of sight, blood spatter and bullet trajectories to complement other techniques such as offender’s height estimation from video surveillance.

To find out more than click here!



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