May
22
2015

FARO UK @ GeoBusiness 2015

An opportunity for geospatial technology manufacturers and service providers to meet face-face with their users to demonstrate the latest technological advances in equipment, explore solutions and capabilities and to collaborate on design issues and options for future developments and requirements.

GeoBusiness London 2015 - The Geospatial Event

FARO will also be in attendance promoting the FARO Focus3D Laser Scanner with accompanying FARO Scene Software. The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – FARO Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

Also being demonstrated will be the groundbreaking FARO Scanner Freestyle3D. The new FARO Freestyle3D is a premium quality, high-precision handheld 3D scanner that can quickly and reliably documents rooms, structures and objects in 3D and create high-definition pointclouds. The highly efficient scanner is suitable for all applications in which installations or properties must be precisely and quickly measured from various perspectives. Thanks to its lightweight carbon fibre body, the FARO Freestyle3D weighs less than a kilogramme, rendering it extremely portable and mobile.

Date:27th-28th May 2015

Location: Business Design Centre, 52 Upper Street, London, N1 0QH, United Kingdom

Apr
23
2015

FARO 3D Documentation Conference 2015

On 21.-22.05.2015 the 5th edition of the annual “FARO 3D Documentation Conference 2015” is set to take place at Motorworld in Stuttgart-Boeblingen/Germany.

The agenda offers over 40 sessions with 3D professionals from a vast array of industries. Plus you will also have the possibility to interchange with FARO and 3D experts, who will also be in attendance at the 3D exhibition.

MOTORWORLD Böblingen

The event includes leading industry speakers, workshops and hands-on-training in the areas of

and will address solutions to business and technology challenges facing the aforementioned industries.

Join this once in a lifetime experience and take the chance to get new impressions, new findings, and make new contacts!

Looking for some FARO insights? Then why not join us on the 20th for a Manufacturing Tour at FARO’s European Headquarter in 70825 Korntal-Muenchingen, which is closely situated to the event itself.

To find out more about the event then click here!

 

Apr
22
2015

ScanLAB Projects: Abandoned Underground Railway Preservation

The next Bond villain’s lair? An alien spaceship lying dormant under an unsuspecting city?

This 3D scan of an underground structure is actually of something much more familiar: a postal service. The Mail Rail network shuttled mail around London for 76 years until being decommissioned in 2003. Now it has been frozen in time. This aerial view of the network is below a sorting station soon to be home to a postal museum – the loop of track will be a train ride whizzing visitors through a kilometre of tunnels.

ScanLAB Railway

The segment of the world’s first driverless, electrified railway has remained untouched since the site shut down, strewn with personal items left behind by workers including dartboards, tools and calendars.

But since the site will be cleaned up before it opens to the public in 2016,digital scans will be the only record of its days as a working piece of infrastructure. To create the image, capturing details as small as 2 millimeters across, a camera-like device on a tripod emits a laser that bounces off objects in its path 250,000 times a second. The scanner needs to capture about four different perspectives to recreate a site, in a process that takes less than 30 minutes.

Underground Railway

The 3D reconstructions assited by the FARO Focus3D could be used in an augmented reality app, allowing museum visitors to view original details of the site with a smartphone while strolling aroud.

Apr
16
2015

FARO UK @ Integrating Emerging Technologies in the AEC Sector

Exploring new technologies and their application within the Architecture, Engineering & Construction sector

Leading with a discussion on the significant impact of 3D printing within the world of architecture, INITION will highlight how this and other cutting-edge technologies continue to advance, enabling new ways to present and understand data.

Logo

With live demonstrations of in-house 3D scanners and printers, haptic interfaces, augmented and virtual realities, and diverse high-end visualisation systems, INITION and FARO will help impart an understanding of how these solutions can be used to improve all stages of project developments including planning and engagement, ultimately increasing visual impact and the overall delivery of information.

The evening will feature keynotes from:

Dave Southam, Regional Manager Europe, Faro

Dave will be presenting the latest laser scanning equipment including the newly released FARO Freestyle 3D and taking a look at the latest software developments are making it easier to use and share the results.

Stephen Holmes, Digital Media Editor, Develop3D

Size Isn’t Everything: 3D Printing Buildings Big and Small, Stephen will explore how 3D printing can impact the AEC sector in a variety of ways.

 

Quick Facts

What: AEC Sector Networking Event
When: 16th April 2015, 6-9pm
Where: Our Shoreditch Demo Studio, 23 Curtain Road
Who: Professionals within the Architectural, Engineering or Construction sectors
Tickets are available here.

 

Apr
13
2015

FARO Focus3D X330 scans San Mamés Stadium

The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

Below is a perfect example of the Focus’s range, even in direct sunlight as well as it’s easy positioning with the integrated GPS receiver, as it scans the San Mamés Stadium, home to  Athletic Bilbao.

As-built surveys using 3D laser scanning technology, such as the FARO Laser Scanner, provide users with detailed point clouds which enable 3D modelling for diverse tasks including building reconstruction, plant layout and enhanced data presentation with augmented reality.

With fast turnaround times on scans of buildings and entire environments, FARO’s 3D laser scanner can deliver fully surfaced CAD models for a variety of industries. Architectural design, civil engineering and construction, facility management, and cultural heritage have all benefited from this 3D FARO solution.

In order to find more video like this then visit our FARO YouTube Channel to see what FARO can do for you!

Apr
02
2015

FARO Focus 3D X330 Laser Scanner – Bridge Documentation

The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

The FARO Focus3D X 330 is specially designed for outdoor applications due its small size, light weight, extra long range, extended scanning possibilities even in direct sunlight and easy positioning with to the integrated GPS receiver. Pefect for a versatile range of applications including; Accident Reconstruction, As-Built Documentation, Business Information Modelling (BIM), Crime Scene Analysis, Virtual Simulation and much more…!

For more videos then head to our FARO GB YouTube page or head over to our FARO UK Website.

Mar
23
2015

On FARO and the Future of 3D with CEO Jay Freeland

jay-freelandJay Freeland, President and CEO of FARO Technologies Inc is one of the leading players in the 3D laser scanning industry. If you know anything about Jay, you know that he has been vocal about pushing the development of 3DLS technology so it can reach the widest professional community possible, a task he refers to as the “democratization” of 3D. Clearly, Jay and FARO have some big plans for the future.

I caught up with Jay following FARO’s 3D Documentation conference this year to discuss FARO’s future, why democratizing 3DLS tech is so important, and why making a more affordable scanner is so difficult. Jay also gave me a picture of what he imagines the future of 3D will look like, and just how far off we are from 3D finally breaking big.


Sean Higgins: During his keynote, Rob Pietsch [FARO’s VP of marketing for the Americas] said that this year’s conference wasn’t about the scanner so much as what you can do with it. Can you talk a little more about the things that FARO is working on to change what you can do with the scanner?

Jay Freeland: Numbers one and two are ease of use and price of entry. When you think about bringing technology to a set of users to adopt when that technology doesn’t exist in the space currently—those are the types of things that can help drive the penetration.

I think the third piece that goes along with that is customizing the solution for the different verticals, and maybe even specific applications depending on how unique they are to the customer. That drives the adoption as well.

For us, internally, we’re driving all three of those at the same time. Some of it is through our own R&D, of course, and there’s still a lot of work to be done on lowering the total cost of ownership, lowering the price of the scanner to the general population.

In many respects, we’re still in the early adopter phase of the cycle. When you look at the price point today versus where we think it needs to go in the longer term, our current pricing is still much higher than the normal threshold for a lot of surveyors, law enforcement, and construction, and those different groups.

A lot of what we do is going to be through mergers and acquisitions. So if you look at the acquisition of CAD Zone, that’s a good example, and a first step toward offering software that’s specific to an industry. There are other acquisitions like that. We can pick up application layers that can easily be attached to the scanner, and allow us to integrate 3D data into existing software.

The last way is via things like the app store. Oliver Bürkler talked about the app store and what we’re doing there. You’ll see users who have very specific applications—they’ll write the app, put it on the app store, and it will go to a really small sliver of the marketplace, but it will be available.

All of that goes back to driving the ease of use for the customer and lowering the entry point.

Sean: This ties into a common theme from the 3D Documentation conferences, which is the democratization of 3D scanning technology. Why is that so important to FARO?

Jay: Number one, it’s important to us because we believe this is the right way to solve the measurement problems that are out there. That means pure measurement in the traditional surveyor’s sense or the traditional construction sense, all the way through the imaging side of it, where we look at how people are establishing the imaging for games, or in the movie or television industries.

The ability to capture rapidly at that level of accuracy and with that level of density and detail is the next evolutionary step away from traditional cameras, tape measures, and total stations.

Number two, if you look at it from a business standpoint—when you’re thinking about surveyors, civil engineers, construction engineers, law enforcement personnel, law enforcement agencies, investigative agencies—there are easily a couple million customers who we could sell the technology to.

FARO as a company has sold to only 15,000 customers in total, and that accounts for the fact that the vast majority of our customers are on the metrology side, in the industrial world, where we’ve been for 30 years. So, we have barely scratched the surface. I mean, that is a massive market opportunity. If we solve that market problem correctly – from the technology standpoint, the ease of use standpoint, the price point – it becomes a viable option for all of those folks to make the transition from 2D into full 3D.

Sean: For anyone who wasn’t there at the conference, what would you say was the big takeaway? I noticed there wasn’t a big product or software announcement.

Jay: What I really want them to think about is the opportunity that’s out there to improve their own businesses, to make their own businesses more productive, more profitable. I want them to think about the opportunity to solve the current problems that people are solving today, plus a whole array of new problems that can’t be adequately solved. The scanner opens up a whole new world for people to do that. That’s takeaway number one.

Number two is that the scanner is already pretty darn easy to use, and pretty affordable, and they can rely on FARO to drive that to a point where it is entirely easy to use and entirely affordable for the population of targeted users.

Now, does that mean that the average Joe on the street is going to walk up and buy a laser scanner? I don’t think we’re anywhere close to that in the near term. When you think about consumer 3D printing and things like that, it’s a whole different marketplace. Somebody’s going to solve problem that through a smartphone, through normal camera technology. The image can be dimensionally proportionate, but it doesn’t need to be dimensionally accurate. It will be good enough for the average consumer, but that’s not FARO’s world.

Our world is the professionals who really need the technology because that’s how they make their living and that’s how they protect the safety of citizens, and how they ensure the efficiency and accuracy of civil works projects, or large construction projects, or buildings and other things of that nature. So takeaway number two is that we are, in fact, going to make the technology accessible to that broad user set.

Takeaway number three is that we are still in the early adopter phase. All the people who are at the conference are the pioneers from an end-user standpoint. So their feedback as to where we should be going – or where we can be going – is vital to helping solve the broader problem across that total market opportunity.

Even if we had a product release, I would say those are three takeaways and the product release would be the fourth one. This is a bigger mission to think about what we are trying to do in a very wide open market where we are barely scratching the surface. We’re just getting started.

Sean: In that case, I’d also like to ask where you’d like to see 3D laser scanning technology used where it isn’t already used. Do you have any ideas for future possibilities? 

Jay: You know, I hear this question and of course I get excited, because I think it could be used everywhere. Like I said, everything’s got three dimensions, it’s just a matter of whether it’s worth capturing it or not.

Can I find an industry where they’re not using it yet? I’m hard-pressed to find one where there isn’t at least someone who’s trying it out. Again, we’re in that early adopter phase. For me the bigger question, or maybe the one that’s more appropriate at this time is: What do we need to do to drive better adoption across all of those different verticals?

Sean: How far do you think the industry is from producing hardware and software that makes this technology truly easy for those verticals to adopt?

Jay: I think we’re close. And when I say close it doesn’t mean that two months from now FARO is going to release something that hits the mark—we’re certainly not that close. When I think about the price point that really makes sense to the marketplace and the feedback we get from the customers we are already dealing with, the engineering task at hand is not insignificant.

It’s not like if you sold 10,000 scanners a year, you’d get enough volume leverage to help bring the price down. You couldn’t sell enough scanners the way the technology is currently configured. So it’s a real engineering challenge to be solved. Obviously nobody has solved it yet, and we feel like we’re in the position to do it.

If we’re sitting here in five years’ time and I’m still at the same price point, then something has gone really amiss.

Sean: At the end of an interview, I like to include a big question. What do you imagine for the future of 3D technology? Where do you think it will be in 50 years?

Jay: If I take the broadest possible picture and not think about what we’re trying to do—in 50 years, if the entire world doesn’t have the ability to do things in 3D at their fingertips, then something has gone awry. Will people still hang regular 2D photographs in their houses because of the image, the memory, etc? Of course. When you’re using smartphone or your camera, are you going to have the option to take the photograph in 3D or 2D? For sure. Will you be able to take that data and send it off to either a 3D printer at your house or a FedEx or a Kinko’s that has them? For sure.

Do I think that the professional world, you know, the industries that we talk about that we target, do I think that all of them will be using 3D technology in 50 years? Yes, I think they will be using it, if not 100% of the time, then it will be pretty darn close.

I think people will be able to walk around with something they are able to hold in their hand and get the same image clarity and accuracy, and perhaps maybe not the same range, but good enough for a lot of the projects. I have no doubt the technology will migrate there.

Do I think that we’ll be able to scan data, immediately upload it through the cloud, back to their offices and already have all the data rendered and all the visualizations done before they even get back? No question in my mind. That’s where I see it headed.

I am one of those true believers that it’s never a matter of if it can be done. Yes, there are laws of physics and things like that, but people have challenged the laws of physics pretty effectively. It’s not a matter of if it can be done, it’s just a matter of when. If you give a 50-year time window like that, there’s not a doubt in my mind that all of that, and probably well beyond that is going to happen.

Feb
06
2015

FARO awarded “Milestone of the Industry”

FARO Technologies Inc., the world’s most trusted source for 3D measurement technology, was elected “Milestone of the Industry” by Vogel Business Media in the category of measurement and testing technology.

Vogel Business Media (VBM), a worldwide major specialist media publisher that focusses on the markets Automation, Automobile, Electronics, Production, Mechanical Engineering, Design Engineering among others celebrates its 120th birthday. In order to share this success, VBM honors based on this long lasting experience within the industry markets important players of the industry for their achievements in innovation and technological development.

The award “Milestone of the Industry” for FARO is based on FARO’s innovation started in 1984 with the development of the first measurement arm used for orthopedic applications and in 1994 to be the first measurement company in the world that developed measurement arms which worked like a fixed co-ordinate measuring machine but would provide mobility, flexibility, wide range measurements with a high accuracy to the users. This innovation was considered a milestone of the industry for its revolutionary contribution to the industrial history. It changed and simplified the way that quality, surfaces and dimensions of products, etc. could be measured. This achievement was followed by a number of outstanding innovations that make FARO a trusted partner in the industry today.

FARO’s success is proven through numerous recognitions and awards. The FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D FARO has already prevailed twice with regards to the Hardware Product of the year award at the Construction Computing award contest, 2012 and recently in November 2014. The Focus3D impressed due to its extremely powerful and accurate three-dimensional measurement method, which offers numerous advantages compared with conventional measurement systems.

Geospatial World, considered the world’s largest geospatial technical resource portal, confirmed this vote for the Focus3D in 2014 with the Technology Innovation Award acknowledging that it sets new standards with regards to performance and ease-of-use.

Metrocom 1 and ScanArm Development

“FARO is very proud to be considered a milestone for the industrial development.”, said Jay Freeland, President and CEO of FARO Technologies Inc., “With our recently introduced new FARO® Scanner Freestyle3D, we will do our utmost to keep this innovation pace and leadership position.” The Freestyle3D is the latest addition to the FARO 3D laser scanning portfolio and provides customers with the same intuitive feel and ease-of-use in a handheld device, enabling users to maneuver and scan in tight and hard-to-reach areas such as car interiors, under tables and behind objects making it ideal for crime scene data collection or architectural preservation and restoration activities.

 

Nov
04
2014

Large-Volume 3D Laser Scanning Technology

Traditionally, measurements for planning and documentation are collected using a combination of tools such as measuring tapes, total stations, digital cameras, and laser range finders, however, the popularity of three-dimension planning and documentation tools through the use of 3D laser scanners is constantly increasing.

04REF203-246-EN - Magazin Process Industry

As a turnkey solution, the 3D laser scanner allows companies to gather measurement data while significantly reducing data collection errors and streamlining the overall workflow.

Capturing high resolution 3D images of complex environments, large-volume 3D laser scanners provide a fast, efficient way to capture millions of data points for use in comprehensive 3D models or detailed reconstructions. Applications vary from forensic and crime scene investigation to surveying, facility management and historic preservation. Laser scanners are an extremely versatile and accurate solution, which allows users to obtain data which would have previously been impossible.

Download the full Large Volume 3D Laser Scanning white paper for how laser scanning works, comparison to other methods, applications and industries, and much more!

Oct
31
2014

FARO @ GeoData Glasgow

FARO is set to participate at the GeoData Event in Glasgow where you will be able to see first-hand how its portable CMMs and LaserScanners for 3D documentation solutions can benefit your operation. These exhibition style events include live demos of the products and provide an opportunity to talk to members of the team about your specific requirements. IMG_20131009_110452 Technology from FARO permits high-precision 3D measurement, imaging and comparison of parts and compound structures within production and quality assurance processes. The devices are used for inspecting components and assemblies, production planning,  large part inspection or structures in 3D, and more…. To find out how to register  for the GeoData Event click here and head up to Glasgow on the 4th of November where we will be featuring our FARO LaserScanner Focus3D X Seriesor visit our website and book your demo today. 



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