May
22
2015

FARO UK @ GeoBusiness 2015

An opportunity for geospatial technology manufacturers and service providers to meet face-face with their users to demonstrate the latest technological advances in equipment, explore solutions and capabilities and to collaborate on design issues and options for future developments and requirements.

GeoBusiness London 2015 - The Geospatial Event

FARO will also be in attendance promoting the FARO Focus3D Laser Scanner with accompanying FARO Scene Software. The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – FARO Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

Also being demonstrated will be the groundbreaking FARO Scanner Freestyle3D. The new FARO Freestyle3D is a premium quality, high-precision handheld 3D scanner that can quickly and reliably documents rooms, structures and objects in 3D and create high-definition pointclouds. The highly efficient scanner is suitable for all applications in which installations or properties must be precisely and quickly measured from various perspectives. Thanks to its lightweight carbon fibre body, the FARO Freestyle3D weighs less than a kilogramme, rendering it extremely portable and mobile.

Date:27th-28th May 2015

Location: Business Design Centre, 52 Upper Street, London, N1 0QH, United Kingdom

May
05
2015

10 Reasons To Use Laser Scanning for Forensics

Laser scanning is rapidly gaining acceptance and becoming more and more commonplace in the law enforcement and accident reconstruction communities. Over the past few years, hardware and software have improved significantly creating a simpler, overall system to capture immense detail in a short period of time.

These are 10, of the many, reasons to consider laser scanners for a forensic application:

1) Easy to use: Many manufacturers are moving toward a simpler interface making operation of the scanner more like a digital camera than a complicated survey instrument.

2) Portability: Laser scanners are smaller in size today than ever before making them easier to deploy to a crime/accident scene and useable by just about anyone.

3) Safety: Data can be collected from a distance, with some scanners collected measurements over 300 meters away. This allows the operator to scan a scene out of harms way. In addition, laser scanners can collect up to 1,000,000 points per second with average scan times of several minutes. Less time on a scene means less time for potential danger to the individuals at the scene. Class I lasers are also being used in laser scanners creating a truly eye-safe environment during the scan.

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4) Speed and Efficiency: Complete color scans can be captured in as little as several minutes creating a virtual scene with high accuracy and detail that can be revisited over and over without physically traveling to the site. In contrast to traditional methods of surveying/documenting a scene, laser scanning can be much faster and allow multiple investigators to have eyes on the virtual scene.

5) Produce a variety of deliverables: Once the scene has been laser scanned, various types of final products can be extracted or produced from the data. For example, anything from a traditional 2D drawing to a detailed 3D animation can be created from the scan data.

6) Peer pressure: With more and more agencies utilizing laser scanners for their scene documentation, the result is more widely accepted. As well as growth in expectations that future scenes will be documented in 3D.

7) Cost Effective: Laser scanners are becoming more and comparable in price to total stations which are traditionally used for documenting traffic accidents.

8) Specialized Measurement Tools: Software for forensic analysis from 3D data also now includes special tools for measuring blood spatter and bullet trajectory, witness/suspect height, etc.

9) Easy to share: More software tools are available to view and document the scan data without the requirement of installing software or purchasing additional licenses.

10) Archive the scene: Once the scene has been laser scanned it has been essentially frozen in time, preserved for future virtual visits by anyone who may wish to investigate the scene. This allows for measurements to be taken that may not have necessarily been thought to be important at the time of capture as well.

Want to find out more about what FARO can do for you? Then head to our FARO Website for more information, or check out or YouTube channel!

Apr
29
2015

FARO over the moon with NASA Rocket Sled Scan

Mobile 3D laser applications stand for precision, innovation and speed. Such as architecture, automotive, earth science, manufacturing or forensics can benefit from mobile laser scanning technology, all of which is set to be demonstrated at the FARO 3D Documentation Conference 2015 on the 21st-22nd of May in Böblingen, Stuttgart.

The international conference will see the coming together of experts and enthusiasts from around the world for the 5th time. The common denominator is the current 3D laser scanning technology – beyond their disciplinary boundaries. For example what do the the US space agency NASA, laser scanning technology and architecture have in common? Aplenty according to a lecture by Larry Klein Kemper AIA, Lanmar Services from Texas, USA at our 3D Documentation Conference “Motor World”.

Renowned architect Larry Klein Kemper, with a focus on BIM, made a name for himself in both Europe and America as the mastermind of animation, rendering and computer modelling.

NASA is known for its exceptional developments and spaceships, of which often ensue exceptional structures.  Disused vehicles such as an oversized rocket sled should simply be documented and be kept as exhibition pieces and 3D models for museums. Larry Klein Kemperis set to show how the large NASA Rocket sled precise point clouds are formed outside with the help of the FARO Focus 3D X 330.

NASA - Rocket sled

The freestyle then starts and the data is transferred in exact geometry. The so-called “Auto Extraction of Geometry” has recently significantly developed, says Larry Klein Kemper – thanks to new software components. The speaker presents two promising possibilities regarding the auto extraction and continues by showing the advantages and limitations of doing so.

The interdisciplinary exchange is very important for the 3D Conference, IT meets film and the software industry meets architecture and transportation planning. Prominent keynote speakers and  first hand reports on current projects. Individual priorities and issues are addressed in the afternoon workshops, including areas such as: Automotive, Conservation and BIM (Building Information Modeling).

The accompanying exhibition with a variety of 3D exhibitors and current software developments rounds off the course of events. An attractive recreational program is also available for the 3D enthusiasts. More information and details can be found here!

Apr
27
2015

SCENE WebShare Cloud – White Paper

A number of trends have converged to make working collaboratively with spatial images easier and more affordable than ever. As a leader in 3D imaging, we at FARO offer one of the first solutions for cloud-based sharing of 3D scanning data. As many experts have commented, the term cloud computing is sometimes just a new name for already existing IT concepts and services. On the other hand, as cloud services and cloud-based applications evolve, cloud computing can allow new ways of working. So for example, FARO’s SCENE WebShare Cloud service offers some scan sharing functions that were already available in 2003 using iQworks – a system designed to run on corporate intranets that was used mainly in the automotive industry. This white paper looks, firstly, at FARO’s SCENE WebShare Cloud application and service in the context of the general trends that are shaping the market for 3D imaging technology and services. Secondly, it examines the initial concerns that many potential cloud users have in relation to data security.

WebshareCloud Interface 2

The service SCENE WebShare Cloud, allows secure collaboration and 3D data sharing in the cloud – a general term for shared computing resources accessible to any user equipped with no more than a standard web browser. With SCENE WebShare Cloud, point cloud scanning projects, prepared in FARO SCENE can be easily published to the cloud and then shared worldwide via the Internet. Registered users can then view and analyse the project data using various intuitive tools like the map and the panoramic view.

SCENE WebShare Cloud offers a secure and interactive environment, which allows users to explore, measure or annotate the project’s scans from any web-capable device. Prior to SCENE WebShare Cloud, any company wishing to do this kind of thing needed to own dedicated infrastructure or server hardware. SCENE WebShare Cloud is the culmination of intensive developments driven by a number of major trends in IT and 3D-documentation.

To read more then click here, or visit our FARO Website and see what we can do for you!

Apr
16
2015

FARO UK @ Integrating Emerging Technologies in the AEC Sector

Exploring new technologies and their application within the Architecture, Engineering & Construction sector

Leading with a discussion on the significant impact of 3D printing within the world of architecture, INITION will highlight how this and other cutting-edge technologies continue to advance, enabling new ways to present and understand data.

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With live demonstrations of in-house 3D scanners and printers, haptic interfaces, augmented and virtual realities, and diverse high-end visualisation systems, INITION and FARO will help impart an understanding of how these solutions can be used to improve all stages of project developments including planning and engagement, ultimately increasing visual impact and the overall delivery of information.

The evening will feature keynotes from:

Dave Southam, Regional Manager Europe, Faro

Dave will be presenting the latest laser scanning equipment including the newly released FARO Freestyle 3D and taking a look at the latest software developments are making it easier to use and share the results.

Stephen Holmes, Digital Media Editor, Develop3D

Size Isn’t Everything: 3D Printing Buildings Big and Small, Stephen will explore how 3D printing can impact the AEC sector in a variety of ways.

 

Quick Facts

What: AEC Sector Networking Event
When: 16th April 2015, 6-9pm
Where: Our Shoreditch Demo Studio, 23 Curtain Road
Who: Professionals within the Architectural, Engineering or Construction sectors
Tickets are available here.

 

Apr
14
2015

ScanLAB Projects – D DAY 360

In Early 2014 ScanLAB Projects accompanied Windfalls Films, Military Historian Steven Zaloga and Colonel Len Fullenkamp, Professor of Military History and Strategy, to the D-Day landing beaches in Normandy, France. The aim was to capture vast stretches of the beach and cliffs at Vierville sur Mer, together with the remains of military bunkers for use in a ground breaking documentary DDAY 360 for PBS. Using the recently launched FARO Focus X330 Laser Scanner ScanLAB were able to capture full colour pointcloud data for almost a mile of the beach, 750 meters of the troops exit route off the beach, a series of bunkers and gun locations in just 3 days on location.

D DAY SL

After two years on the drawing board, D-Day was the most meticulously planned operation in military history, a logistical effort on a scale never seen before or since. On June 6, 1944, 3,000 planes dropped 23,000 airborne troops behind German lines, and 7,000 ships delivered around 20,000 military vehicles and 130,000 allied soldiers, who stormed five heavily defended French beaches in an all-or-nothing assault on Nazi occupied Europe. Once on the shore, the troops had to negotiate two million mines buried in the sand, 46,000 fearsome beach obstacles and hundreds of miles of barbed wire, while dodging the shells and bullets fired by 40,000 German defenders.

Focusing on the most important strip of Omaha beach that day – the exit at Vierville-sur-Mer – D-Day 360 strips D-Day back to its raw data to reveal how the odds of victory, in the greatest gamble of World War II, swung on what happened over a five-hour period on a five mile stretch of French coastline.

Data gathered through laser scanning, 3D computer modelling and eye-witness accounts bring the battlefield to life as never before. The film takes advantage LIDAR to re-create the landscape and allow viewers to switch effortlessly between the macro and the micro – pulling back for the big picture and zooming in to a close-up of a single soldier on the battlefield. It’s a new approach and perspective that tells the story with details never before available.

Click here to view the Full FARO ScanLAB – Case Study or check out the Video!

Apr
02
2015

FARO Focus 3D X330 Laser Scanner – Bridge Documentation

The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

The FARO Focus3D X 330 is specially designed for outdoor applications due its small size, light weight, extra long range, extended scanning possibilities even in direct sunlight and easy positioning with to the integrated GPS receiver. Pefect for a versatile range of applications including; Accident Reconstruction, As-Built Documentation, Business Information Modelling (BIM), Crime Scene Analysis, Virtual Simulation and much more…!

For more videos then head to our FARO GB YouTube page or head over to our FARO UK Website.

Mar
31
2015

Successful scanning of Diseworth Parish Church to build digital 3D models

The Digital Building Heritage Group is a multi-disciplinary research cluster of staff and research students at De Montfort University specialising in scanning of historic buildings. The survey of this church is part of a current Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Connected Communities initiative in conjunction with the Trust’s ongoing All our Stories Heritage Lottery Funded (HLF) project called “A Thousand Years of History – Diseworth Parish Church from Mercia to Modern Times”.

St. Michael’s and All Angels was a prime candidate for the As-built Documentation because of its complexity and delightful geometric “irregularities” which arise from the many changes and additions that have been made to the building over its one thousand year history. Diseworth also has a superb little heritage centre in a recently restored Baptist Chapel. It was an ideal location for the field base for examination of the documentary evidence the Trust has collected about the history of their church and for discussing the detailed survey of the building fabric and the 3D modelling work. “This is a central part of the co-production process of this project, working together with the Trust volunteers and their experts not only to add value and a further dimension to their work but to enable them to adopt and use some of our digital technologies at a number of levels”, said Douglas Cawthorne.

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The laser scanning process was started inside of the building and then moved to the exterior. “A major advantage of laser scanning is that you can accurately measure features dozens of meters away which makes measuring church spires and high vaults much easier and less risky,” added Douglas Cawthorne. “The FARO Focus3D is particularly suited to capturing the complex forms of historic buildings at a level of detail that is particularly useful” highlights the leader of the Digital Building Heritage Group at De Montfort University. Before using the Laser Scanner time consuming traditional hand-survey measurements would have been needed but with the Faro Focus this time was cut substantially. To supplement the laser scans the Diseworth Heritage Trust had also undertaken a detailed photographic survey, focusing specifically on individual architectural features and materials. High quality photographs have for a long time been an important aspect of historic building documentation but photographs specifically of materials like wall surfaces and floors as well as of specific architectural features can also be used to produce digital “texture maps” which can then be applied to the 3D digital models to give them a realistic appearance. “This is something we are keen to do with St. Michael’s and All Angels because the variation in materials, particularly in the stonework is important in communicating the developmental sequence of the building” highlights Dr. Cawthorne.

The technology of modern laser scanning makes the process of acquiring dimensional data relatively of that data and then using it to then build one or more 3D digital models of the building that takes time. The aim of using the 3D model is to show the building in a series of developmental phases from its earliest Saxon form in the early 11th century AD to its form as it is now. This is intended to assist the Diseworth Heritage Trust in explaining the history of St. Michael’s and All Angels through illustrations for a forthcoming book to be published by the Trust towards the end of the year.

Mar
27
2015

3D Laser Scanning for Coastal Research

HR Wallingford, an independent specialist for research and consultancy in civil engineering and environmental hydraulics, boasts an international track record of achievement in applied coastal research and consultancy and key to this work is their state of the art physical modeling facility in Wallingford. This facility includes six wave basins ranging in plan size from 25 x 32 m to 75 x 32 m and three wave flumes ranging from 45m to 100m in length.
Housed in a purpose built modelling hall, these basins are used to investigate how breakwaters and other coastal structures behave when subjected to both ‘frequent’ i.e. day-to-day wave conditions as well as ‘storm’ conditions including hurricane or cyclonic conditions. Waves can be modelled up to 0.25m (model scale) in height allowing HR Wallingford’s engineers to assess each structure’s ability to withstand damage and provide sufficient shelter. These criteria are best tested by creating a scaled physical model of the structure in question, running waves at it under frequent and storm conditions and then accurately measuring the outcome. To achieve this HR Wallingford uses a FARO Focus3D laser scanner to take before and after millimetre accurate scans of the model, allowing the movement of elements of the coastal structures or the mobile bed material to be monitored.

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“Previously we detected any movement in the model structures either by using manual methods or an older style scanner with an oscillating beam but both processes were slow and dated,” explains Andrew. “When KOREC first showed us the FARO Focus3D, it was obvious that it was going to be 100 times faster than our old style manual methods and a least 10 times faster than our existing scanner.
On top of the Focus3D’s phenomenal speed, it is compact and lightweight making it easy to move around our large modeling area. We tend to use the scanner at its highest resolution because generally we are looking for movements of the order 2-3mm. This movement would translate to movements of the order 60-180mm in the real-world.” The scanner works at the touch of a button and HR Wallingford were up and running after just one day of training, focused primarily on the preparation and analysis of the data to create the details their modelling process required.

To find out more about FARO’s versatile product range then head over to our FARO UK Website

Mar
20
2015

Ninety Six National Historic Site preserved thanks to FARO Focus3D Laser Scanner

South Carolina ETV and the University of South Florida’s Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies are working collaboratively with the Ninety Six National Historic site to produce a public documentary highlighting the technology and the story of the Kosciusko tunnel located at the park.

This project is a partnership between the mentioned entities and throws light on a lesser known part of the Revolutionary War History. The Kosciuzsko (pronounced KOS CHoos’CO) tunnel which is located leading up to Star Fort, is a tunnel that was dug by patriots in an effort to dislodge the British from their stronghold at Ninety Six.

Military Tunnel 3D Scan

The Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies was contracted to map the tunnel and surrounding area, whereby they used one our very own, the FARO Focus3D Laser Scanner to get the job done! The finished product will be used to find the best way to preserve the tunnel AND at the same time make it accessible through 3D mapping and imaging for preservation and educational purposes. ETV Upstate is working with AIST and the Ninety Six National Historic Site to help with the educational part of this project.

The overall project includes a thirty minute program, a short documentation video of the Tunnel laser mapping process, and other products derived from video content collected in support of the full program.

To find out more about the FARO Focus 3D Laser Scanner by heading over to our FARO Website and checking out our YouTube Page!



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