Jun
16
2015

Pratt & Miller Uses FARO Laser ScanArm for GM’s Corvette Racing Program

PROBLEM

Based in New Hudson, Michigan, Pratt & Miller is a world-class engineering company that takes automotive programs from concept to reality. They are a respected industry leader providing cutting-edge engineering and manufacturing solutions to their clients. Their total design team uses the most advanced research and development technologies available. Pratt & Miller performs first-article inspection for most parts; reverse engineers models, fabricated parts, and any purchase parts that lack accurate CAD; and verifies complicated bodywork, surface features, machine parts, and full interiors. Basically, they measure everything from small components to complete race cars.

Measuring with hand tools is time consuming and creates inaccuracies due to individual error. These tools also did not provide Pratt & Miller with the means to measure its more complicated parts and freeform surfaces without undesirable contact. This work had to be farmed out and they lost direct control of data.

Corvette racing FARO

SOLUTION

FARO provided the accuracy Pratt & Miller was looking for at the speed they need. They have the utmost confidence in the results they getfrom FARO. Co-founder Gary Pratt says, “We use FARO to design, construct, and analyze ‘virtual’ components, CFD, systems, and complete cars – every facet of a project from initial conception to the finished product.”

The FARO ScanArm was selected for its portability, flexibility, accuracy, compact design, and reputation. Mike Kurylo, a design engineer at Pratt & Miller, says, “The quality of the FARO equipment, the ease of training, and the knowledge of their support are all first rate. Their customer service goes well above and beyond what one would expect from such a globally recognized technology firm. It feels like having your own pit crew!”

Gary Latham, a lead engineer at Pratt & Miller, says, “FARO is incredibly useful with our tight timeframes. About 30-40 percent of our parts are manufactured in the workshop and they need to be entered into CAD and now we can do that easily with faster data capture.” They also use the ScanArm in their Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to fill in any missing pieces of the puzzle. FARO returns control of the data process to Pratt & Miller and eliminates the need to farm out projects.

Corvette racing FARO_1

ROI

In today’s ever increasingly competitive conditions, Pratt & Miller is always searching for every last bit of performance enhancement – be it in the form of speed, time, accuracy, or efficiency. FARO answers the call on each of these.

The most intelligent design solutions are centered on the integration of the best tools. Pratt & Miller engineers use the most up-to-date and powerful computer software and hardware in existence. The next logical step for them was a FARO solution.

“We’re constantly updating, expanding technology and FARO opened new parameters in manufacturing and engineering for us,” Gary Pratt says. “FARO has really opened our eyes and they’ve been fantastic for us. Once you get something like this, you can’t see how you did without it.”

May
27
2015

FARO @ THE ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SHOW / SUBCON

The Advanced Manufacturing Show, brought to you by MWP, provides a platform for board-level decision makers, production and quality engineers to interact with the latest technology and gain a competitive edge by applying high-productivity solutions to enhance manufacturing performance, efficiency and quality.

Showcasing world class advanced manufacturing technologies, visitors will be able to review, plan and make their investment decisions for machine tools & accessories, laser, cutting tools and manufacturing software.

AM & Subcon Event

Co-located with the Subcon ShowThe Engineer Design & Innovation Show and a world-class technology and innovation Conference led by The Engineer, this is an invaluable opportunity to gain insight from leading experts on current industry challenges and stay up-to-date on the latest manufacturing developments, best practice and new trends at one venue over three days.

Thus providing us with the perfect platform to showcase our innovative product range, including our FARO EDGE ScanArm HD, FARO Gage and FARO Laser Tracker Vantage!

Dates: 02nd – 04th Jun, 2015

Address: Hall 4, NEC, Birmingham

Stand No: A37

We are looking forward welcoming you!

Mar
23
2015

On FARO and the Future of 3D with CEO Jay Freeland

jay-freelandJay Freeland, President and CEO of FARO Technologies Inc is one of the leading players in the 3D laser scanning industry. If you know anything about Jay, you know that he has been vocal about pushing the development of 3DLS technology so it can reach the widest professional community possible, a task he refers to as the “democratization” of 3D. Clearly, Jay and FARO have some big plans for the future.

I caught up with Jay following FARO’s 3D Documentation conference this year to discuss FARO’s future, why democratizing 3DLS tech is so important, and why making a more affordable scanner is so difficult. Jay also gave me a picture of what he imagines the future of 3D will look like, and just how far off we are from 3D finally breaking big.


Sean Higgins: During his keynote, Rob Pietsch [FARO’s VP of marketing for the Americas] said that this year’s conference wasn’t about the scanner so much as what you can do with it. Can you talk a little more about the things that FARO is working on to change what you can do with the scanner?

Jay Freeland: Numbers one and two are ease of use and price of entry. When you think about bringing technology to a set of users to adopt when that technology doesn’t exist in the space currently—those are the types of things that can help drive the penetration.

I think the third piece that goes along with that is customizing the solution for the different verticals, and maybe even specific applications depending on how unique they are to the customer. That drives the adoption as well.

For us, internally, we’re driving all three of those at the same time. Some of it is through our own R&D, of course, and there’s still a lot of work to be done on lowering the total cost of ownership, lowering the price of the scanner to the general population.

In many respects, we’re still in the early adopter phase of the cycle. When you look at the price point today versus where we think it needs to go in the longer term, our current pricing is still much higher than the normal threshold for a lot of surveyors, law enforcement, and construction, and those different groups.

A lot of what we do is going to be through mergers and acquisitions. So if you look at the acquisition of CAD Zone, that’s a good example, and a first step toward offering software that’s specific to an industry. There are other acquisitions like that. We can pick up application layers that can easily be attached to the scanner, and allow us to integrate 3D data into existing software.

The last way is via things like the app store. Oliver Bürkler talked about the app store and what we’re doing there. You’ll see users who have very specific applications—they’ll write the app, put it on the app store, and it will go to a really small sliver of the marketplace, but it will be available.

All of that goes back to driving the ease of use for the customer and lowering the entry point.

Sean: This ties into a common theme from the 3D Documentation conferences, which is the democratization of 3D scanning technology. Why is that so important to FARO?

Jay: Number one, it’s important to us because we believe this is the right way to solve the measurement problems that are out there. That means pure measurement in the traditional surveyor’s sense or the traditional construction sense, all the way through the imaging side of it, where we look at how people are establishing the imaging for games, or in the movie or television industries.

The ability to capture rapidly at that level of accuracy and with that level of density and detail is the next evolutionary step away from traditional cameras, tape measures, and total stations.

Number two, if you look at it from a business standpoint—when you’re thinking about surveyors, civil engineers, construction engineers, law enforcement personnel, law enforcement agencies, investigative agencies—there are easily a couple million customers who we could sell the technology to.

FARO as a company has sold to only 15,000 customers in total, and that accounts for the fact that the vast majority of our customers are on the metrology side, in the industrial world, where we’ve been for 30 years. So, we have barely scratched the surface. I mean, that is a massive market opportunity. If we solve that market problem correctly – from the technology standpoint, the ease of use standpoint, the price point – it becomes a viable option for all of those folks to make the transition from 2D into full 3D.

Sean: For anyone who wasn’t there at the conference, what would you say was the big takeaway? I noticed there wasn’t a big product or software announcement.

Jay: What I really want them to think about is the opportunity that’s out there to improve their own businesses, to make their own businesses more productive, more profitable. I want them to think about the opportunity to solve the current problems that people are solving today, plus a whole array of new problems that can’t be adequately solved. The scanner opens up a whole new world for people to do that. That’s takeaway number one.

Number two is that the scanner is already pretty darn easy to use, and pretty affordable, and they can rely on FARO to drive that to a point where it is entirely easy to use and entirely affordable for the population of targeted users.

Now, does that mean that the average Joe on the street is going to walk up and buy a laser scanner? I don’t think we’re anywhere close to that in the near term. When you think about consumer 3D printing and things like that, it’s a whole different marketplace. Somebody’s going to solve problem that through a smartphone, through normal camera technology. The image can be dimensionally proportionate, but it doesn’t need to be dimensionally accurate. It will be good enough for the average consumer, but that’s not FARO’s world.

Our world is the professionals who really need the technology because that’s how they make their living and that’s how they protect the safety of citizens, and how they ensure the efficiency and accuracy of civil works projects, or large construction projects, or buildings and other things of that nature. So takeaway number two is that we are, in fact, going to make the technology accessible to that broad user set.

Takeaway number three is that we are still in the early adopter phase. All the people who are at the conference are the pioneers from an end-user standpoint. So their feedback as to where we should be going – or where we can be going – is vital to helping solve the broader problem across that total market opportunity.

Even if we had a product release, I would say those are three takeaways and the product release would be the fourth one. This is a bigger mission to think about what we are trying to do in a very wide open market where we are barely scratching the surface. We’re just getting started.

Sean: In that case, I’d also like to ask where you’d like to see 3D laser scanning technology used where it isn’t already used. Do you have any ideas for future possibilities? 

Jay: You know, I hear this question and of course I get excited, because I think it could be used everywhere. Like I said, everything’s got three dimensions, it’s just a matter of whether it’s worth capturing it or not.

Can I find an industry where they’re not using it yet? I’m hard-pressed to find one where there isn’t at least someone who’s trying it out. Again, we’re in that early adopter phase. For me the bigger question, or maybe the one that’s more appropriate at this time is: What do we need to do to drive better adoption across all of those different verticals?

Sean: How far do you think the industry is from producing hardware and software that makes this technology truly easy for those verticals to adopt?

Jay: I think we’re close. And when I say close it doesn’t mean that two months from now FARO is going to release something that hits the mark—we’re certainly not that close. When I think about the price point that really makes sense to the marketplace and the feedback we get from the customers we are already dealing with, the engineering task at hand is not insignificant.

It’s not like if you sold 10,000 scanners a year, you’d get enough volume leverage to help bring the price down. You couldn’t sell enough scanners the way the technology is currently configured. So it’s a real engineering challenge to be solved. Obviously nobody has solved it yet, and we feel like we’re in the position to do it.

If we’re sitting here in five years’ time and I’m still at the same price point, then something has gone really amiss.

Sean: At the end of an interview, I like to include a big question. What do you imagine for the future of 3D technology? Where do you think it will be in 50 years?

Jay: If I take the broadest possible picture and not think about what we’re trying to do—in 50 years, if the entire world doesn’t have the ability to do things in 3D at their fingertips, then something has gone awry. Will people still hang regular 2D photographs in their houses because of the image, the memory, etc? Of course. When you’re using smartphone or your camera, are you going to have the option to take the photograph in 3D or 2D? For sure. Will you be able to take that data and send it off to either a 3D printer at your house or a FedEx or a Kinko’s that has them? For sure.

Do I think that the professional world, you know, the industries that we talk about that we target, do I think that all of them will be using 3D technology in 50 years? Yes, I think they will be using it, if not 100% of the time, then it will be pretty darn close.

I think people will be able to walk around with something they are able to hold in their hand and get the same image clarity and accuracy, and perhaps maybe not the same range, but good enough for a lot of the projects. I have no doubt the technology will migrate there.

Do I think that we’ll be able to scan data, immediately upload it through the cloud, back to their offices and already have all the data rendered and all the visualizations done before they even get back? No question in my mind. That’s where I see it headed.

I am one of those true believers that it’s never a matter of if it can be done. Yes, there are laws of physics and things like that, but people have challenged the laws of physics pretty effectively. It’s not a matter of if it can be done, it’s just a matter of when. If you give a 50-year time window like that, there’s not a doubt in my mind that all of that, and probably well beyond that is going to happen.

Mar
18
2015

FARO ScanArm HD scans a vast array of surfaces!

The FARO Edge ScanArm HD combines the flexibility and the functionalities of a FARO Edge measuring Arm with the high-definition Laser Line Probe HD creating a powerful contact/non-contact portable measurement system ideal for challenging application requirements.

The FARO Edge ScanArm HD delivers rapid point cloud collection with extreme resolution and high accuracy without any special coatings or target placement – all in a compact and easy-to-use system.

A short video showcasing the FARO ScanArm and it’s it’s ability to scan a vast spectrum of surfaces ranging from shiny carbon fibre to a mirror finished chrome part, as shown in the video below.

ScanArm Shiny Scan Video Screen shot

The extra wide scan stripe and fast frame rate boosts productivity by increasing coverage and reducing scanning time. Intricate components can be captured in fine detail as a result of the 2,000 actual points per scanline and the new blue laser featuring noise reduction technology. Users can dramatically reduce required training time with the new crosshair feature and existing LED Rangefinder functionality, which provides real-time scanning feedback.

Our FARO Edge ScanArm HD is the most affordable, high performance contact/non-contact measurement system and is ideal for product development, Inspection, and Quality control and offers capabilities such as point cloud comparison with CAD, rapid prototyping, Reverse engineering, and 3D modeling of free-from surfaces.

Feb
25
2015

Cosmo Wenman – The Dancing Faun of Pompeii

The Dancing Faun was discovered on October 26, 1830 in the ruins of the most opulent Roman home discovered at Pompeii: the House of the Faun, as it later became known, which was also home to the Alexander Mosaic. The Faun is thought to be either a 2nd-century Greek original, or a very high-quality Roman copy.

With help from the FARO Edge ScanArm HD, Cosmo Wenman were able to scan a 18th-centruy plaster cast of the Faun at the Skulpturhalle Basel museum. The scan did however require some digital resculpting to restore loss of detail in the plaster and to restore two broken fingers on his left hand. With this Cosmo Wenman plan to use the 3D scanned data to cast a 1:1 copy in bronze, the first of its kind.

Dancing faun!

Ideal for capturing highly accurate and detailed historical artifacts, the FARO Edge Scan Arm can enable the reverse engineering or even aid in the restoration of artefacts just like that of the Dancing Faun. However the products versatility means that, no matter what you are up against, be it a need to perform 3D inspections, CAD-to-part analysis or alignments – FARO’s portable CMMs are the industry standard in Metrology.

Nov
14
2014

3D in the medical industry

140327-science-3d-printed-skull_e8f32032da2f37a65e83ba184442e287

A skull made of Plexiglas based on a 3D scan…science fiction? Not for the surgeons of the University Medical Centre Hospital in Utrecht, who are using Plexiglas to replace the skull of a woman in desperate need.

The rapid development of 3D-scans and printing is not only opening doors for the manufacturing industry but also are causing a real revolution in the medical world.

The extremely detailed images provided by the 3D scanners lend themselves to a wide range of applications, from plastic surgery to the development of tailor-made prostheses and support for medical research.

[Read more …]

Oct
23
2014

FARO Assists Unison in British Airways Project

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Scarborough based Unison Ltd has recently installed a comprehensive turnkey package for tube bending at British Airways’ Heathrow-based aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) facility.

This turnkey package is aided greatly by an advanced FARO ScanArm that uses laser and tactile measurement techniques to obtain detailed and high accurate 3D representations of tubes, enabling precise and rapid reverse-engineering. The resulting programs can then be downloaded to British Airways’ new bending machines within minutes.

The all-inclusive Unison solution is based on a semi-manual bender with CNC control and a fully CNC all-electric model, both machines are used extensively throughout the global aerospace industry and able to support a wide range of MRO activities.

The loss of revenue resulting from the grounding of modern aircraft can be astronomical, making fast-turnaround MRO capabilities vital to economic performance.

Unison’s renowned tube bending capability, together with the multiple advantages gained through FARO’s precise measurement and reverse engineering competence will help meet the long-term challenging needs of this vital repair and maintenance workshop.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Unison’s complete measure/program/manufacture MRO package will enable a quick and cost-effective repair of fluid lines on aircraft by reverse engineering parts and then accurately re-creating them in the workshop.

Under the terms of the order from British Airways, Unison is responsible for all aspects of bending machine integration and associated equipment connectivity. As Unison’s Managing Director, Alan Pickering, points out, “This turnkey solution demands tight integration of hardware and software resources to create a seamless production environment for efficient on-demand manufacture of specialist precision parts.

“As FARO is a global leader within the field of portable, precise measurement and is a trusted Unison ‘partner’, we were delighted to include the company’s advanced ScanArm and software as part of this turnkey package. The synergy between the ScanArm’s excellent reverse-engineering capability and Unison’s advanced tube bending machines, results in the perfect all-inclusive package.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

With versatile contact and non-contact measuring capabilities, the innovative ScanArm is ideal for performing rapid reverse-engineering tasks. In addition the popular FARO instrument can utilise CAD overlays to check geometries against design or CAD comparison and evaluate deviations in surface form, ensuring that all inspected parts are manufactured to exact tolerances.

Unison’s proven expertise within the aerospace sector and FARO’s accurate, reliable ScanArm are both guaranteeing a comprehensive package offering for British Airways.

For more information on the FARO ScanArm click here!

Oct
16
2014

Featured White Paper: An Alternative to Check Fixtures

One major aspect of automotive and aerospace manufacturing has long been that the critical nature of the final products they build requires their parts and sub-components to be free of defects.

However, the need for manufacturers to keep costs down and efficiency up in order to remain competitive in the marketplace has a negative effect on the manufacturers’ ability to ensure totally defect-free parts.

A check fixture is a device that allows production parts to be inspected by comparing the part to the geometry and features of the fixture. If the part and check fixture fit together, the part is “good”.These check fixtures, used in conjunction with hand tools, have provided a balance between the need to keep costs down and part integrity.

Given that check fixtures are extremely expensive and require a large time investment, it is not surprising that firms are now turning to the latest technology to help them eliminate check fixtures from their processes. Portable CMMs offer the ideal solution for keeping costs down and ensuring defect-free parts. Portable CMMs come in many forms, the most common of which are laser trackers, articulating arms and hand-held 3D Laser Scanners.

The choice of technology is based on the parts being measured and the information you need from the parts, and provides a cheaper alternative to the expense of check fixture. Portable CMMs eliminate the need for storage, maintenance and rework costs for check fixtures not currently in use.

Click here to download the full white paper to read more!

Oct
03
2014

FARO at Aero Engineering 2014

Aeroengineering-Show-2014

FARO UK is happy to announce that we will be participating at this year’s Aero Engineering 2014!

Now in its 6th year, the ‘Aero Engineering Show’ 2014 will host 200+ specialist aerospace-related exhibitors displaying solutions ranging from materials processing technologies to digital design & manufacturing solutions, from test & measurement to process engineering…and much more.

Aero Engineering gives you the unique opportunity to see the leading technology suppliers & supply chain partners/services supporting current & future aerospace engineering supply chain programmes.

At the event we will show you how you can both save time and improve quality by using our portable 3D measurement equipment such as the FARO Gage, FARO Laser Tracker, FaroArm and the brand new FARO Edge ScanArm HD.

Date: 11-12th November
Stand: G38, Hall 5
Location: NEC, Birmingham

For more information visit the official Aero Engineering website or email postman-uk@faroeurope.com

Sep
26
2014

Evotech aided by FARO Edge ScanArm

Evotech, based in Villa Agnedo (Trento, Italy), is a company with an international reach that manufacturers special aftermarket accessories and components for sport and naked bikes.

Particular attention is paid at Evotech to the development of products that celebrate the concepts of design, functionality and ease of assembly. Evotech is therefore one of the points of excellence of ‘Made in Italy’ manufacturing, and has been able to raise its technological level by investing a good percentage of its yearly profits in research and development and cutting-edge production facilities.

Evotech
– Benelli compressor by Evotech – 

[Read more …]



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