Apr
16
2015

FARO UK @ Integrating Emerging Technologies in the AEC Sector

Exploring new technologies and their application within the Architecture, Engineering & Construction sector

Leading with a discussion on the significant impact of 3D printing within the world of architecture, INITION will highlight how this and other cutting-edge technologies continue to advance, enabling new ways to present and understand data.

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With live demonstrations of in-house 3D scanners and printers, haptic interfaces, augmented and virtual realities, and diverse high-end visualisation systems, INITION and FARO will help impart an understanding of how these solutions can be used to improve all stages of project developments including planning and engagement, ultimately increasing visual impact and the overall delivery of information.

The evening will feature keynotes from:

Dave Southam, Regional Manager Europe, Faro

Dave will be presenting the latest laser scanning equipment including the newly released FARO Freestyle 3D and taking a look at the latest software developments are making it easier to use and share the results.

Stephen Holmes, Digital Media Editor, Develop3D

Size Isn’t Everything: 3D Printing Buildings Big and Small, Stephen will explore how 3D printing can impact the AEC sector in a variety of ways.

 

Quick Facts

What: AEC Sector Networking Event
When: 16th April 2015, 6-9pm
Where: Our Shoreditch Demo Studio, 23 Curtain Road
Who: Professionals within the Architectural, Engineering or Construction sectors
Tickets are available here.

 

Apr
14
2015

Augmented Reality: a complete solution for the industrial field

The Control Fair will once again take place at the Stuttgart Exhibition Centre, May 5-8.

Join us at FARO’s booth (Hall 3, Booth 3404) where we’ll demonstrate a workstation that contains a FARO Edge measuring arm that has been enriched with Augmented Reality software, Metaio Engineer.

The FARO and Metaio systems are perfectly suited for each other, especially in the context of quality control applications in the industrial field.

Different industries, including the automotive and mechanical engineering sectors, can benefit from Augmented Reality. The technology enriches a user’s view of a real assembly part with superimposed 3D computer-aided design (CAD) models to make all the following possible on a see-through device (e.g., tablet PC, head-mounted display, etc.): quick visual comparisons, assembly checks, identify errors, and detect deviations.

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The new release of Metaio Engineer provides built-in support for FARO measuring arms. All the necessary features are factory-set and ready to use, from calibration to other functions that support your daily tasks.

These are the basic steps to set up an Augmented Reality system based on the FARO Edge measuring arm:

  1. Mount the industry camera with available adapters onto the grip of the measuring arm. 2. Calibrate the camera and spatial relation between the camera and the measuring arm. 3. Determine the position of the arm in relation to the subject being analyzed 4. Visualize a superimposed CAD model onto an existing model, part or product. 5. Compare planned vs. actual state measurements.

Do you want to learn more?

Visit our booth (Hall 3, booth 3404) during the Control Fair and check out our live demonstration.

Reserve your free entrance ticket for the fair here!

Apr
14
2015

ScanLAB Projects – D DAY 360

In Early 2014 ScanLAB Projects accompanied Windfalls Films, Military Historian Steven Zaloga and Colonel Len Fullenkamp, Professor of Military History and Strategy, to the D-Day landing beaches in Normandy, France. The aim was to capture vast stretches of the beach and cliffs at Vierville sur Mer, together with the remains of military bunkers for use in a ground breaking documentary DDAY 360 for PBS. Using the recently launched FARO Focus X330 Laser Scanner ScanLAB were able to capture full colour pointcloud data for almost a mile of the beach, 750 meters of the troops exit route off the beach, a series of bunkers and gun locations in just 3 days on location.

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After two years on the drawing board, D-Day was the most meticulously planned operation in military history, a logistical effort on a scale never seen before or since. On June 6, 1944, 3,000 planes dropped 23,000 airborne troops behind German lines, and 7,000 ships delivered around 20,000 military vehicles and 130,000 allied soldiers, who stormed five heavily defended French beaches in an all-or-nothing assault on Nazi occupied Europe. Once on the shore, the troops had to negotiate two million mines buried in the sand, 46,000 fearsome beach obstacles and hundreds of miles of barbed wire, while dodging the shells and bullets fired by 40,000 German defenders.

Focusing on the most important strip of Omaha beach that day – the exit at Vierville-sur-Mer – D-Day 360 strips D-Day back to its raw data to reveal how the odds of victory, in the greatest gamble of World War II, swung on what happened over a five-hour period on a five mile stretch of French coastline.

Data gathered through laser scanning, 3D computer modelling and eye-witness accounts bring the battlefield to life as never before. The film takes advantage LIDAR to re-create the landscape and allow viewers to switch effortlessly between the macro and the micro – pulling back for the big picture and zooming in to a close-up of a single soldier on the battlefield. It’s a new approach and perspective that tells the story with details never before available.

Click here to view the Full FARO ScanLAB – Case Study or check out the Video!

Apr
13
2015

FARO Focus3D X330 scans San Mamés Stadium

The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

Below is a perfect example of the Focus’s range, even in direct sunlight as well as it’s easy positioning with the integrated GPS receiver, as it scans the San Mamés Stadium, home to  Athletic Bilbao.

As-built surveys using 3D laser scanning technology, such as the FARO Laser Scanner, provide users with detailed point clouds which enable 3D modelling for diverse tasks including building reconstruction, plant layout and enhanced data presentation with augmented reality.

With fast turnaround times on scans of buildings and entire environments, FARO’s 3D laser scanner can deliver fully surfaced CAD models for a variety of industries. Architectural design, civil engineering and construction, facility management, and cultural heritage have all benefited from this 3D FARO solution.

In order to find more video like this then visit our FARO YouTube Channel to see what FARO can do for you!

Apr
09
2015

Unsurpassable measurements at Dallara

In 1972, following a distinguished career in the automotive industry, Gian Paolo Dallara founded Dallara Automobili in Varano de’ Melegari, near Parma, Italy. Since then, the company has expanded, designing and building cars for almost all of the racing competitions and winning races worldwide.

This is a success story, the result of a passion for mechanics, involving the company‘s 180 employees (including 60 engineers) on a daily basis: men and women who work with passion and skill on high-technology projects in order to gain the edge in the fiercely competitive world of motor racing. In particular, it is absolutely necessary that each stage of production and assembly carried out in the factory at Varano de’ Melegari is tested and validated using adequate measurement and control procedures. Paola Carlorosi Quality Assurance & Quality Control Manager at Dallara Automobili, explains: “Our cars are a concentration of high technology and innovation. Quality control is of paramount importance as it must ensure that Dallara cars are produced according to expected standards, providing exceptional performance and reliability.”

FARO‘s sophisticated portable measurement equipment fully satisfies the technological requirements of Dallara Automobili and FARO has been the automotive company’s chosen partner for a number of years. Carlorosi: “Our collaboration has been ongoing since 2007, demonstrating the strength of our partnership. Our latest investment dates back to 2012 when we decided to buy a 2.7m measuring arm, the FARO Edge ScanArm, which we mainly use for non-contact quality control and reverse engineering.” The FARO Edge ScanArm – which combines the FARO Edge portable measurement arm with a laser scanning probe (FARO Laser Line Probe) – is a portable 7-axis coordinate measuring machine (CMM), which allows the user to easily check product quality through 3D inspections, comparisons with the CAD design, dimensional analysis and reverse engineering. The integrated Laser Line Probe for laser scanning ensures a perfect 3D measurement without touching the surface of the product. At Dallara, the FARO Edge ScanArm is mainly used to check the airfoils and the most important structural components made of carbon fibre. “With this new measuring device,” continues Paola Carlorosi, “the speed of data acquisition has increased enormously. Considering that the device operator completed the training course and was operational after just three days, we can only be satisfied.”

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And that’s not all: “The data analysis phase has become easier as the CAM2 Measure 10 measurement software develops really clear, easy-to-navigate reports. Today, reporting is much more comprehensive and informative than ever before and, once the point cloud has been obtained, every detail can be analysed section by section – especially the airfoils – by comparing the theoretical project data with the actual measurements. We also execute processes and controls for external customers who are very pleased to receive reports that are easy to read, clear and transparent, even for non-experts. It is an advantage for our business.” Another important benefit is that it is no longer necessary to treat components with opacifiers, which was necessary in the past for the non-contact measurement of black and glossy carbon surfaces. Paola Carlorosi: “The FARO laser probe technology allows polished carbon surfaces to be scanned without having to apply opacifiers, which also required processing to remove the product afterwards. The whole operation has therefore become much faster: we save 30 minutes on average for each square metre to be checked.”

Dallara is currently using the FARO Edge ScanArm in the development and construction of the chassis for the new 2014 Japanese Championship Super Formula. It has been used right from the prototype phase. Paola Carlorosi: “Even in this situation, we have been able to perform quality controls more precisely, saving on average 50% of the time spent on the same activities in the past. It’s an amazing achievement.” And she concludes: “In general, the checks performed during the production and testing phases allow us to reduce errors, improve our core manufacturing processes and, in conclusion, achieve a higher quality level. If these checks are carried out using high-performance equipment that increases quality and reduces workload, then the benefits are definitely worthy of a Grand Prix!”

Apr
07
2015

FARO® Streamlines As-Built to BIM Workflows with PointSense for Revit®

Coventry, 31st March 2015 – FARO Technologies, Inc. announces the release of the newly designed PointSense for Autodesk’s Revit® building  design software. PointSense introduces breakthrough functionality to significantly improve the evaluation and conversion of point cloud data to Building Information Modeling (BIM).

BIM has become a standard in the planning, building and management of new facilities and Autodesk Revit® is one of the most established BIM programs for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry. FARO’s latest software release accelerates and simplifies the analysis and design of laser scan data directly in Autodesk Revit®.

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“PointSense is FARO’s first software release following our recent acquisition of kubit™ and upholds FARO’s strategy to be a leader in the AEC market,” stated Jay Freeland, FARO’s President and CEO. “As BIM continues to be an established requirement in the construction industry, we recognize the need to provide customers with a complete field to finish solution. PointSense enhances the architectural design process by simplifying the extraction of BIM models to point clouds. This is merely the beginning of FARO’s efforts to greatly enhance scan-to-BIM workflows.”

PointSense users will experience additional functionality compared to traditional native Autodesk Revit® tools previously available to the market. Some of the new features include: extraction and alignment of architectural walls, creation of Revit® family types such as doors, windows, beams, construction lines and ground models, real 3D snap-to-point clouds, plane detection and scaled ortho-image generation.

PointSense will be available to users beginning May 4th, 2015. For more information on PointSense for Revit® click here!

Apr
02
2015

FARO Focus 3D X330 Laser Scanner – Bridge Documentation

The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

The FARO Focus3D X 330 is specially designed for outdoor applications due its small size, light weight, extra long range, extended scanning possibilities even in direct sunlight and easy positioning with to the integrated GPS receiver. Pefect for a versatile range of applications including; Accident Reconstruction, As-Built Documentation, Business Information Modelling (BIM), Crime Scene Analysis, Virtual Simulation and much more…!

For more videos then head to our FARO GB YouTube page or head over to our FARO UK Website.

Mar
23
2015

On FARO and the Future of 3D with CEO Jay Freeland

jay-freelandJay Freeland, President and CEO of FARO Technologies Inc is one of the leading players in the 3D laser scanning industry. If you know anything about Jay, you know that he has been vocal about pushing the development of 3DLS technology so it can reach the widest professional community possible, a task he refers to as the “democratization” of 3D. Clearly, Jay and FARO have some big plans for the future.

I caught up with Jay following FARO’s 3D Documentation conference this year to discuss FARO’s future, why democratizing 3DLS tech is so important, and why making a more affordable scanner is so difficult. Jay also gave me a picture of what he imagines the future of 3D will look like, and just how far off we are from 3D finally breaking big.


Sean Higgins: During his keynote, Rob Pietsch [FARO’s VP of marketing for the Americas] said that this year’s conference wasn’t about the scanner so much as what you can do with it. Can you talk a little more about the things that FARO is working on to change what you can do with the scanner?

Jay Freeland: Numbers one and two are ease of use and price of entry. When you think about bringing technology to a set of users to adopt when that technology doesn’t exist in the space currently—those are the types of things that can help drive the penetration.

I think the third piece that goes along with that is customizing the solution for the different verticals, and maybe even specific applications depending on how unique they are to the customer. That drives the adoption as well.

For us, internally, we’re driving all three of those at the same time. Some of it is through our own R&D, of course, and there’s still a lot of work to be done on lowering the total cost of ownership, lowering the price of the scanner to the general population.

In many respects, we’re still in the early adopter phase of the cycle. When you look at the price point today versus where we think it needs to go in the longer term, our current pricing is still much higher than the normal threshold for a lot of surveyors, law enforcement, and construction, and those different groups.

A lot of what we do is going to be through mergers and acquisitions. So if you look at the acquisition of CAD Zone, that’s a good example, and a first step toward offering software that’s specific to an industry. There are other acquisitions like that. We can pick up application layers that can easily be attached to the scanner, and allow us to integrate 3D data into existing software.

The last way is via things like the app store. Oliver Bürkler talked about the app store and what we’re doing there. You’ll see users who have very specific applications—they’ll write the app, put it on the app store, and it will go to a really small sliver of the marketplace, but it will be available.

All of that goes back to driving the ease of use for the customer and lowering the entry point.

Sean: This ties into a common theme from the 3D Documentation conferences, which is the democratization of 3D scanning technology. Why is that so important to FARO?

Jay: Number one, it’s important to us because we believe this is the right way to solve the measurement problems that are out there. That means pure measurement in the traditional surveyor’s sense or the traditional construction sense, all the way through the imaging side of it, where we look at how people are establishing the imaging for games, or in the movie or television industries.

The ability to capture rapidly at that level of accuracy and with that level of density and detail is the next evolutionary step away from traditional cameras, tape measures, and total stations.

Number two, if you look at it from a business standpoint—when you’re thinking about surveyors, civil engineers, construction engineers, law enforcement personnel, law enforcement agencies, investigative agencies—there are easily a couple million customers who we could sell the technology to.

FARO as a company has sold to only 15,000 customers in total, and that accounts for the fact that the vast majority of our customers are on the metrology side, in the industrial world, where we’ve been for 30 years. So, we have barely scratched the surface. I mean, that is a massive market opportunity. If we solve that market problem correctly – from the technology standpoint, the ease of use standpoint, the price point – it becomes a viable option for all of those folks to make the transition from 2D into full 3D.

Sean: For anyone who wasn’t there at the conference, what would you say was the big takeaway? I noticed there wasn’t a big product or software announcement.

Jay: What I really want them to think about is the opportunity that’s out there to improve their own businesses, to make their own businesses more productive, more profitable. I want them to think about the opportunity to solve the current problems that people are solving today, plus a whole array of new problems that can’t be adequately solved. The scanner opens up a whole new world for people to do that. That’s takeaway number one.

Number two is that the scanner is already pretty darn easy to use, and pretty affordable, and they can rely on FARO to drive that to a point where it is entirely easy to use and entirely affordable for the population of targeted users.

Now, does that mean that the average Joe on the street is going to walk up and buy a laser scanner? I don’t think we’re anywhere close to that in the near term. When you think about consumer 3D printing and things like that, it’s a whole different marketplace. Somebody’s going to solve problem that through a smartphone, through normal camera technology. The image can be dimensionally proportionate, but it doesn’t need to be dimensionally accurate. It will be good enough for the average consumer, but that’s not FARO’s world.

Our world is the professionals who really need the technology because that’s how they make their living and that’s how they protect the safety of citizens, and how they ensure the efficiency and accuracy of civil works projects, or large construction projects, or buildings and other things of that nature. So takeaway number two is that we are, in fact, going to make the technology accessible to that broad user set.

Takeaway number three is that we are still in the early adopter phase. All the people who are at the conference are the pioneers from an end-user standpoint. So their feedback as to where we should be going – or where we can be going – is vital to helping solve the broader problem across that total market opportunity.

Even if we had a product release, I would say those are three takeaways and the product release would be the fourth one. This is a bigger mission to think about what we are trying to do in a very wide open market where we are barely scratching the surface. We’re just getting started.

Sean: In that case, I’d also like to ask where you’d like to see 3D laser scanning technology used where it isn’t already used. Do you have any ideas for future possibilities? 

Jay: You know, I hear this question and of course I get excited, because I think it could be used everywhere. Like I said, everything’s got three dimensions, it’s just a matter of whether it’s worth capturing it or not.

Can I find an industry where they’re not using it yet? I’m hard-pressed to find one where there isn’t at least someone who’s trying it out. Again, we’re in that early adopter phase. For me the bigger question, or maybe the one that’s more appropriate at this time is: What do we need to do to drive better adoption across all of those different verticals?

Sean: How far do you think the industry is from producing hardware and software that makes this technology truly easy for those verticals to adopt?

Jay: I think we’re close. And when I say close it doesn’t mean that two months from now FARO is going to release something that hits the mark—we’re certainly not that close. When I think about the price point that really makes sense to the marketplace and the feedback we get from the customers we are already dealing with, the engineering task at hand is not insignificant.

It’s not like if you sold 10,000 scanners a year, you’d get enough volume leverage to help bring the price down. You couldn’t sell enough scanners the way the technology is currently configured. So it’s a real engineering challenge to be solved. Obviously nobody has solved it yet, and we feel like we’re in the position to do it.

If we’re sitting here in five years’ time and I’m still at the same price point, then something has gone really amiss.

Sean: At the end of an interview, I like to include a big question. What do you imagine for the future of 3D technology? Where do you think it will be in 50 years?

Jay: If I take the broadest possible picture and not think about what we’re trying to do—in 50 years, if the entire world doesn’t have the ability to do things in 3D at their fingertips, then something has gone awry. Will people still hang regular 2D photographs in their houses because of the image, the memory, etc? Of course. When you’re using smartphone or your camera, are you going to have the option to take the photograph in 3D or 2D? For sure. Will you be able to take that data and send it off to either a 3D printer at your house or a FedEx or a Kinko’s that has them? For sure.

Do I think that the professional world, you know, the industries that we talk about that we target, do I think that all of them will be using 3D technology in 50 years? Yes, I think they will be using it, if not 100% of the time, then it will be pretty darn close.

I think people will be able to walk around with something they are able to hold in their hand and get the same image clarity and accuracy, and perhaps maybe not the same range, but good enough for a lot of the projects. I have no doubt the technology will migrate there.

Do I think that we’ll be able to scan data, immediately upload it through the cloud, back to their offices and already have all the data rendered and all the visualizations done before they even get back? No question in my mind. That’s where I see it headed.

I am one of those true believers that it’s never a matter of if it can be done. Yes, there are laws of physics and things like that, but people have challenged the laws of physics pretty effectively. It’s not a matter of if it can be done, it’s just a matter of when. If you give a 50-year time window like that, there’s not a doubt in my mind that all of that, and probably well beyond that is going to happen.

Mar
06
2015

FARO assits in the 36 Pit Fire Investigation

ESTACADA, Ore. – A wildfire that burned thousands of acres and threatened hundreds of homes back in September last year and thanks to FARO and the FARO Focus 3D Laser Scanner investigarors were able to conclude that the fire was started by bullet fragments igniting dry grass and brush at gravel pit popular with target shooters. The 36 Pit Fire was not intentionally set, according to fire officials. The gravel pit was open to recreational target shooting when the fire started.

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The fire threatened homes near Estacada and forced evacuations and had more than 1,000 people fighting the fire, including 12 elite Hot Shot crews, with the fire being estimated at over 5,500 acres in size.

Click here to watch the Video explaing the 36 Pit Fire and how FARO helped assist in the investigation, or want to find out more about our versatile product range? Then check out our website!

Mar
04
2015

FARO® Expands Presence in Architecture, Engineering and Construction with Acquisition of kubit

Located in Dresden, Germany, kubit has been developing field-proven software products to enable and simplify the use of real world objects in CAD applications since 1999. Initially launched to link total stations directly to AutoCAD, today kubit is the industry leader in providing tools to integrate 3D laser scan data with CAD environments such as Autodesk Revit and AutoCAD.  kubit’s software is hardware independent, giving customers the flexibility to utilize any hardware offering, thus ensuring maximum productivity.

“The acquisition of kubit is an exciting step in FARO’s strategy to develop integrated, disruptive 3D documentation product offerings for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction market,” stated Jay Freeland, FARO’s President and CEO.  “By adding kubit’s products to our portfolio, customers now have significantly enhanced software options to serve a vast array of point cloud modeling, analysis needs, and measurement capabilities with very high connectivity to the Autodesk suite of products.”

For more information about FARO’s 3D scanning solutions visit our website or to see the full press release of the aquisition click here!

Kubit



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