Apr
18
2016

The FARO laser scanner records everything that happens on the building site…

IMG_20151023_093107Previously a bank, now a large restaurant of 720 metres, with a capacity of 140 seats: the construction of Studio 16, which opened its doors in Orléans in the
Autumn of 2015, represented a huge challenge in terms of construction, development of the space and decoration.

MB Design, a firm specializing in interior architecture, was charged with the creation and the realisation of this new concept, and monitored the progress of the building work closely, over a period of 8 months. “We had decided to carry out surveys using a FARO Focus3D X 130 scanner as the work progressed. In doing so, we were able to ensure a real and precise indication of the position of all elements of the site that would end up being hidden by various partitions and covers. The objective was to know exactly where the pipes and cables lay, which would turn out to be very useful later, for example when making an alteration, or if a problem were to occur in one of the hidden installations (a blocked pipe or a leak, for example),” said Michael Bustillo, Director of MB Design and sister company ABM2 (which specialises in surveys).

Like any establishment open to the public, the restaurant had to comply with building regulations before being allowed to open. A problem comes to light at this point: the facilities are 4 cm above the permitted height. Who is to blame? The plumber says he worked with the reference line, i.e. the horizontal level line marked on the wall by the bricklayer. The surveys obtained by ABM2 quickly prove otherwise: the resolution of the FARO Focus3D scanner is such that the bricklayer’s line is clearly visible. This simple fact has farreaching consequences: “Firstly, we have not lost time discussing whether the bricklayer or the plumber was right. Then we saved money because to trace a possible line level would have required breaking tiles which had been laid on top of it. Finally, there is no dispute to be resolved: the plumber being wrong, the removal of the fittings and their reinstallation at the right height becomes his problem,” explains Michael Bustillo. In playing the role of “justice of the peace”, the scanner saved a great deal of time and the establishment was able to open on schedule.

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Apr
08
2016

4 Reasons to attend the MACH Fair

It’s that time of the year again! FARO will be attending the UK’s premier manufacturing technologies exhibition, MACH 2016. This event runs every 2 years.

With a 7 days left until the exhibition check out the 4 reasons to be at the FARO stand booth 5910.

 

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 FARO Robo Imager- The first mobile, ready to work 3D measurement solution will be on show at the MACH Fair. A mobile and flexible robot with a setup time of less than 5 minutes, it is seen as a product with great benefits for the automotive, aerospace and mechanical engineering industry.

FARO experts on hand to help – The wonderful expert team will be on hand to help you out with any queries you may have. You will be provided with the opportunity to see live demonstrations from a wide range of products from Metrology & 3D Documentation.

 

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Great Quality stands – There will be a wide range of innovative products from many different exhibitors. FARO will be exhibiting a wide range of products from Metrology and 3D Documentation. This will include the newly highly-adaptable FARO Factory Array 3D Imager, a metrology grade non-contact scanner which utilizes blue light technology to capture millions of high resolution 3D coordinate measurements in seconds. We will also be presenting the high speed FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D X Series for detailed 3D modelling and image documentation as well as the recently released 3D Laser Scanner Freestyle3D X with enhanced accuracy of 1 millimetre at a 1-metre range.

Raffle Prize – Test your knowledge of the FARO Factory Array 3D Imager and your in with a chance to win a prize. Test your knowledge of our new scanner metrological level FARO 3D Imager Array Cobalt for the production workshop and assembly . Come to stand booth 5910 and take our quiz and return your completed ballot in the ballot box at the FARO booth. You can also download the quiz here.

 

COBALT RAFFLE

 

You will be able to find the answers on our FARO Factory Array Imager information page.

Don’t forget stand booth 5910

 

 

Mar
04
2016

Leith Harbours whaling station

Ghost town on rough sea

elephant seal

Impressively looking Seal Elephants basking in the sunshine with the crew

The South Georgia Island is located in the Southern Atlantic Ocean. At the begining of the 20th Century, this Island had six whaling stations which made it biggest in the Southern Hemisphere. After the destruction of most of the whaling stations during World War II, the station ceased operating in 1965. The slowly decaying buildings in the area are the last pieces of evidence of the past industrial whaling heritage. However the remoteness of the location and major costs needed to renovate the station means that the entire site has been left to fall down. For this reason, the entire faciliy has been exactly surveyed and documented.

To do so, the Geometria Heritage Management Group was involved in the adrenaline fuelled project involving Elephant seals, asbestos contained ruins and strong snow storms. All six stations have been captured with the help of the FARO Focus3D including storage, piers, barracks and accommodation facilities as well as the surrounding area (the Island cemetery and the former hospital).

 

 

Working conditions were anything but ordinary. Nowadays the South Georgia Island is practically uninhabited and serves only as a research station. A five day ship tour around the Falkland Island was required to bring the team on-site. Due to the abestos contamination of the facilities, the team had to wear protective clothing at all times.

At 8 am the research crew struck off with temperatures at -10° from the base camp, with the “Pharos SG” and used a a small speed boat to head to Leith Harbour. As well as the stormy weather conditions, the Island is highly populated with Seals and Elephant seals making scanning work even more difficult. Nonetheless, Geometria generated from 30 to 80 Scans per day with the Focus3D and disposed of more than 2700 Scans after one and a half months. The FARO Focus3D managed to precisely document outdoor facilities and the inside area of the whaling station.

After data processing, specialitsts converted the raw data into CAD drawings and 3D CAD models. This data is freely available for scientists as well as all interested researchers who have been using this for interesting projects.

 

speed boat

The journey to the whaling station was difficult at times due to the weather conditions

internal condition whaling

Few internal areas were well-preserved

 

asbestos

The high asbestos contamination makes protective clothing an absolute  must-have

Dec
18
2015

New methods in the Big Bat Cave

Engineers trial new surveying methods in Kentucky. Parts of the “Big Bat Cave” are precisely recorded with 3D laser scanners. An extremely demanding project: There is hardly any light underground and it is very confined in places.

The Big Bat Cave is a great attraction for cave explorers and nature-lovers. The history of the area comes to life here; rare crayfish, crickets and bats are at home there. For the “Kentucky Karst Conservancy” , conservation of the landscape and nature is a matter of top priority, and in the engineers of QK4, Louisville, they found highly capable supporters.

The experts are testing new methods of acquiring data when surveying – and one of them is recording using 3D laser scanners. The engineers swapped their traditional surveying tools for a FARO Focus3D X 130 laser scanner whilst systematically and digitally recording the “Big Bat Cave” system in three dimensions. An exciting and groundbreaking experiment, which engineer Ben Shinabery explains step by step.

 

The three dimensional measurement is carried out from various standpoints using precisely defined reference points. The laser scanner takes around 8 minutes for each setting, measuring almost 1 million points per second in a 360-degree radius. This provides the surveyors with point clouds, which are then processed on the computer. FARO SCENE software is ideal in this context for creating three-dimensional models. The surveying team worked through the cave metre by metre, including through some tight spots which were difficult to access.

In this cramped, dark environment the advantages of the FARO Focus3D X 130 laser scanner come into their own: small and light, quick to set up and dismantle, and easily transported in the cave. Non-contact scanning delivers true-to-scale and ultra-precise data. The initial results were impressive. Project manager Ben Shinabery: “Now almost anyone can use the 3D models for scientific analysis: students, scientists and consultants.”

Kentucky is a region well-known for its caves – including the Mammoth Cave National Park, the longest known cave system in the world.  However, its little sister in Breckinridge Kentucky also has its charms, as shown by this project. Now it is to contribute to preserving and protecting it. A first impression of the 13.9-mile cave system recorded to date is provided by the fly-through, which carries you off into the widely ramified system of underground corridors.

 

Dec
09
2015

FARO ‘state-of-the-art’ Scanning

FARO is a renowned supplier of high-quality portable coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) and 3D imaging devices, FARO technology is used throughout the world for high-precision 3D measurement and scanning. Due to it’s ease of use, accuracy and reliability it has become the measurement of choice across a diverse range of sectors including the Architecture, Construction and Crime scene analysis.

Installation with Focus scanner

FARO has now extended application of products to new areas. Tracy Hill who worked at the University of Central Lancashire was able to manipulate the FARO Focus 3D x 130 and the FARO Software from here colleagues to allow the creation of a major installation – Sensorium. Given the fact she has never used it before, the ease of use meant that she could experiment and create the effects of visualisation that she was looking for.

Click here to read the full text.

Nov
26
2015

Always one step ahead – 10 years of laser scanning

An unprecedented success story began ten years ago when iQvolution AG of Ludwigsburg, Germany, was acquired by FARO Technologies, Inc. This global market leader in the area of portable coordinate measuring machines added 3D laser scanners to its array of products as a result.

“We are confident that this step will push the continuing development of our 3D laser scanning technology towards new products and strengthen the global expansion of our market presence”, said Dr. Bernd Becker, founder of iQvolution and now Chief Technology Strategist at FARO Europe, commenting on the merger – and he was proven right.

A whole range of innovative developments in the areas of 3D laser technology and computer-aided measuring systems bear witness to success. FARO has been ahead of the market for years. How about some examples? In 2006, FARO introduced a laser scanner that allowed three-dimensional measurements to be taken outdoors – and this was a sensation. A short time afterwards, the company again surprised the market when they presented the Photon laser scanner.

The big breakthrough came in 2010 – only five years after taking over the 3D laser scanner line of business and incorporating it into the FARO portfolio: FARO developed the smallest and lightest laser scanner in the world. Furthermore, this high-tech device was as easy to use as a digital camera. The company showcased its consistent ongoing developments with the Focus3D X 130 and the Focus3D X 330, which allow an even greater range while providing excellent and precise measurement results. The 3D documentation business also sustained further growth that year with the Freestyle3D models – top-quality high-precision hand scanners.

Timeline_EN

[Read more …]

Oct
22
2015

FARO Laser scanner Focus3D aids Costain in improving its capture and sharing of field data

In December 1836, the London terminus of the world’s first passenger railway, the London & Greenwich Railway, opened. Almost 180 years later and known as London Bridge Station, the UK’s fourth busiest railway station still reflects some of its early 19th century origins, being an elevated structure built on brick arches, but the complex has since been expanded and reconfigured piecemeal many times.

In addition FARO Laser scanner Focus3D aids Costain in improving its capture and sharing of field data to being a terminus, the station now also caters for through services, including cross-London Thameslink connections, but by the early 2000s the station had become a bottleneck hampering rapid movement of both passengers – some 56 million use the station each year – and trains. To remove the bottleneck and to expand passenger capacity by 40 per cent, Network Rail set about transforming London Bridge station.

bridge_worker

Six low-level platforms for terminating services were to be raised to the height of the platforms of through services; the total of through platforms would be increased from six to nine; and a new single concourse at the foot of London’s iconic Shard was to be constructed – and all while continuing to operate passenger rail services through the station and allowing interchange with London Underground, local bus and taxi services, and onward journeys on foot or by bicycle.

To read the full story click here

Oct
20
2015

Decided with precision

Red carpet at INTERGEO: the new Freestyle meets with huge interest in Stuttgart.

FARO used this year’s INTERGEO to allow people to get a sense of its products up close. Visitors to the trade fair could pick up the FARO Scanner Freestyle3D and experience the ease of use and the quality of the point cloud for themselves. As part of a competition, they were first asked to size up the model of a fish by eye. The participants then measured the fish precisely and by themselves using the Freestyle3D. Visitors to the stand evidently enjoyed the promotion, which also showed how efficient the scanning and registering of point clouds can be without special setup work. In addition, it was demonstrated that the device can be used by almost everyone immediately. Here too, precision was crucial. At the end, the prize on offer for the promotion was a weekend in Hamburg.
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Clear value was also important to visitors to the stand. Despite the concentrated content, FARO products are astonishingly manageable and portable. They also perform well in difficult circumstances and offer reliable protection against dust and water drops. Particular attention was paid to the fact that the point clouds of the FARO Focus3D can be easily combined with those of the Freestyle3D.

These qualities were praised, as was the simple processing of the point clouds and the opportunities for 3D modelling, which have arisen through the merger with the company formerly known as kubit GmbH (now: 3D Software GmbH). The new version 16.5 of the PointSense program was also met with considerable interest. They now contain additional tools and functionality for the efficient evaluation of 3D laser scanning data within Autodesk’s AutoCAD® and Revit®, thus speeding up the documentation of survey data considerably. Among the new PointSense functions for AutoCAD® are, for instance, the simultaneous fit of multiple polygons cross-sections or contours with point cloud layers, the single-click plane extraction and auto-boundary detection. Revit® users also benefit from a new, intuitive surface analysis tool that enables the deformation of any surface – such as walls, floors and ground – to be visualised in comparison to the point cloud. In addition, users of the Agisoft PhotoScan software can now import their calibrated photos into PointSense Heritage to use them as an additional reference source for modelling and image plan creation.

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Oct
15
2015

FARO @ GeoData Edinburgh

FARO is set to participate at the GeoData Event in Edinburgh where you will be able to see first-hand how our 3D documentation solutions can benefit your operation.

We will showcasing our FARO Focus3D Laser Scanner with accompanying FARO Scene Software. The smallest and lightest laser scanners on the market – FARO Focus3D X Series are ideal tools for indoor and outdoor applications. The fast and accurate laser scanners Focus3D offer everything you might expect from professional 3D laser scanners – with FARO’s established and well-known level of simplicity.

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Also being demonstrated will be the groundbreaking FARO Scanner Freestyle3D. The new FARO Freestyle3D is a premium quality, high-precision handheld 3D scanner that can quickly and reliably documents rooms, structures and objects in 3D and create high-definition pointclouds. The highly efficient scanner is suitable for all applications in which installations or properties must be precisely and quickly measured from various perspectives. Thanks to its lightweight carbon fibre body, the FARO Freestyle3D weighs less than a kilogram, rendering it extremely portable and mobile.

To find out how to register  for the GeoData Event click here and head up to Edinburgh on the 12th of November!

Oct
14
2015

Increased safety for pieces of art

Now it’s official: paintings and pieces of art that have been scanned with the FARO Focus3D suffer no damage through heat. This has been confirmed by a report by Seibersdorf Labor GmbH.

The recordings of pieces of art or interiors of museums is quick and reliable with laser scanners – and can even be done during visiting hours thanks to the safety of scanners for eyes. Nevertheless, the question of whether pieces of art suffer damage as a result of scanning arises time and again. Reason enough for FARO to have this danger investigated in a report.

Oil paintings are seen as particularly sensitive. Paint and oil have low thermal conductivity and heat capacity values. The high-energy laser could cause an increase in the temperature on the surface and damage the substance of the painting considerably. The report does away with these fears.

Meet the new FARO Laser Scanner Focus3D X 330
For a worst case scenario, a FARO Focus3D X was set up at a distance of one metre from an oil painting – without any protective glass between the piece and the scanner. If a scan is conducted in which the scanner moves horizontally – as is customary in practice – there is a temperature increase on the surface of the oil painting of less than 1.3 degrees Celsius. Even if the head of the scanner doesn’t move and the painting is thus scanned with the laser beams for several minutes, the maximum temperature increase is under 2 degrees Celsius.

To test restorative techniques for example, it is normal to place items with oil paints in an oven for several days at over 60 degrees Celsius and so accelerate an aging process. Against this backdrop, it quickly becomes clear that a short-term temperature increase of less than 2 degrees Celsius due to the FARO Focus3D will cause no damage. This has now been confirmed in the report by Seibersdorf Labor GmbH. It also permits the conclusion that photochemical effects are very unlikely at a wavelength of 1,550 nm – good news for the use of the FARO family of laser scanners in the area of cultural assets.



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